A Hymn To The World – Inspirational Quotations

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“When negotiations failed, Sri Aurobindo returned to his reliance on the use of his spiritual force alone against the aggressor and had the satisfaction of seeing the tide of Japanese victory which had, till then, swept everything before it, change immediately into a tide of rapid, crushing and finally immense and overwhelming defeat. He had also, after a time, the satisfaction of seeing his pre-vision about the future of India, justify themselves so that she stands independent of internal difficulties.” ~ Now the darkest of ages is upon us, thus, we all need to use our spiritual force to transcend the darkest of vibrations that hang heavy in the ether and in ourselves, to bring about a new consciousness to the world. Change now, like back then, only can come through our efforts to usher in a higher realm of light  for mankind and the planet.”

Sri Aurobindo’s Intervention in World War – II

But this did not mean, as most people supposed, that he [Sri Aurobindo] had retired into some height of spiritual experience devoid of any further interest in the world or in the fate of India. It could not mean that as the very principle of his Yoga was not only to realise the Divine and attain to complete spiritual consciousness, but also to take all life and all world activity into the scope of this spiritual consciousness and action, and to base life on the Spirit and give it a spiritual meaning. In his retirement, Sri Aurobindo kept a close watch on all that was happening in the world and in India and actively intervened whenever necessary, but solely with a spiritual force and silent spiritual action; for it is part of the experience of those who have advanced far in Yoga, that besides the ordinary forces and activities of the mind and life and body in Matter, there are other forces and powers that can act and do act from behind and from above. There is also a spiritual dynamic power which can be possessed by those who are advanced in the spiritual consciousness, though all do not care to possess or if possessing it, to use it, and this power is greater than any other and more effective. It was this force which, as soon as he had attained to it, he used, at first only in a limited field of personal work, but afterwards in a constant action upon the world forces. He had no reason to be dissatisfied with the results or to feel the necessity of any other kind of action. Twice, however, he found it advisable to take, in addition, other action of a public kind. The first was in relation to the Second World War.

At the beginning, he did not actively concern himself with it, but when it appeared as if Hitler would crush all the forces opposed to him and Nazism dominate the world, he began to intervene. He declared himself publicly on the side of the Allies, made some financial contributions in answer to the appeal for funds and encouraged those who sought his advice to enter the army or share in the war effort. Inwardly, he put his spiritual force behind the Allies from the moment of Dunkirk when everybody was expecting the immediate fall of England and the definite triumph of Hitler, and he had the satisfaction of seeing the rush of German victory almost immediately arrested and the tide of war begin to turn in the opposite direction. This, he did, because he saw that behind Hitler and Nazism were dark Asuric forces and that their success would mean the enslavement of mankind to the tyranny of evil, and a set-back to the course of evolution and especially to the spiritual evolution of mankind: it would lead also to the enslavement not only of Europe but of Asia, and in it of India, an enslavement far more terrible than any this country had ever endured, and the undoing of all the work that had been done for her liberation. It was this reason also that induced him to support publicly the Cripps’ offer and to press Congress leaders to accept it. He had not, for various reasons, intervened with his spiritual force against the Japanese aggression until it became evident that Japan intended to attack and even invade and conquer India. He allowed certain letters he had written in support of the war affirming his views of the Asuric nature and inevitable outcome of Hitlerism to become public. He supported the Cripps’ offer because, by its acceptance, India and Britain could stand united against the Asuric forces and the solution of Cripps’ could be used as a step toward independence. When negotiations failed, Sri Aurobindo returned to his reliance on the use of his spiritual force alone against the aggressor and had the satisfaction of seeing the tide of Japanese victory, which had till then swept everything before it, change immediately into a tide of rapid, crushing and finally immense and overwhelming defeat. He had also, after a time, the satisfaction of seeing his prevision about the future of India justified so that she stands independent of internal difficulties.