Comments – Saying Nothing At All – Poetry

Just saying:   yellowstarshiningbright

My thoughts for today were about weeding the garden but instead, and after a thorough search on my blogs followers, I am beginning to question the authenticity of my followers. I wish I could WEED some of them from  my blog. I have well over a thousand, yet I only hear from a handful of those! Now something is dreadfully wrong here! My blog is over four years old, thus, I suspect, most of the original followers have long since left blogging. ( Makes sense due to the fast pace of today’s lifestyles. )  Then why can’t I delete them? A question I should be asking  “The  Happiness Word Press Team”, I suppose. Then there are those that follow and “like”, but never comment. How can anyone like a post, almost each and every one, and not comment? Beats me! I would like to suggest that there are fake “likers”, and “speedy likers”, who are hoping you will “like” them back. This is not really blogging is it? I had hoped blogging was about sharing like-minded interests and building a blogging community. Am I wrong?


The idiots Guide To blogging says:

Blogging Rules and Etiquette yellowstarshiningbright

Your blog is your own space on the web, and depending on your goals, you can publish the type of content you want and not publish the type of content you don’t want. That’s where blog policies come into the picture. Policies are intended to protect you and your audience as well as set expectations about the type of content that will or will not be published on your blog.

Comment Policy

As your blog grows and your posts receive more and more comments, you’ll undoubtedly receive comments you don’t want to publish on your blog or that require minor editing before you’ll publish them. For example, hateful comments that attack individuals usually aren’t welcome on blogs, and comments that include obscenities could be offensive. Similarly, comments that might be spam can hurt the user experience on your blog and should be deleted.

A comment policy allows you to define what types of comments you will delete or edit using the comment moderation tools in your account. Your comment policy also protects you, so you can refer visitors whose comments are edited or deleted to your established policy to understand why their comments were revised or not published at all.

 


After reading Maureen McCabe’s post,  “ActiveRain – Saying Nothing At all”, I became aware of the discussion revolving around leaving GPTFS (Great Post, Thanks For Sharing) comments on a post. Is there value for anyone in doing it? Personally, I believe there is value, but that is because I think compliments are gifts. However, it did make me think — how can I write better comments myself ? I came across some good, basic advice from Meredith Farkas — 31 Day Comment Challenge.  She is “Head of Instructional Initiatives” at Norwich University (VT) and teaches a class on blogging.

http://meredith.wolfwater.com/wordpress/

  yellowstarshiningbright

 

Comments should be  as below listed.  The point is most people do not receive comments or if they do, they are few and far between.

 

1) Relevant to the post 2) Thoughtful and insightful 3) Use your unique voice 4) Keep it civil 5) Make it short and readable, but also meaningful.

Her own personal, reflective thoughts and commitment to commenting

1) Commenting is a critical component of community-building in the blogosphere.

2) I feel more connected to others when I comment.  ~ (My thoughts exactly)

3) I take commenting very seriously and that’s ok.

4) Never comment when you’re angry or frustrated. (errrr well, my mistake sometimes)

5) I need to be better about responding to comments. (Yes indeed, we all should)  yellowstarshiningbright

 

Good thoughts to remember. In the future, I will try to keep her points in mind, but if I should ever slip up and just pay you a simple compliment — don’t deduct points from me.  🙂

 


 

Humour is always a great way to end on, so here’s a song and a poem. 🙂  ( I wish you all a happy blogging Sunday. 🙂 )

 Music When You Say Nothing At All – for all the silent ones. 

yellowstarshiningbright

..

Could Be A Bloggers Lament? Smile. 🙂

Sometime when you’re feeling important;
Sometime when your ego’s in bloom
Sometime when you take it for granted
You’re the best qualified in the room,

Sometime when you feel that your going
Would leave an unfillable hole,
Just follow these simple instructions
And see how they humble your soul;

Take a bucket and fill it with water,
Put your hand in it up to the wrist,
Pull it out and the hole that’s remaining
Is a measure of how you will be missed.

You can splash all you wish when you enter,
You may stir up the water galore,
But stop and you’ll find that in no time
It looks quite the same as before.

The moral of this quaint example
Is do just the best that you can,
Be proud of yourself but remember,
There’s no indispensable man. –

—  Saxon N. White Kessinger, Copyright 1959

 

Any thoughts on this topic? Merci   –

The post is sticky for now.  By making the post sticky, I feel, it gives an opportunity to new bloggers to get acquainted with the ups and downs of the blogoshere.  There are also a number of very interesting comments posted by others on this topic. Do read. thank you.

yellowstarshiningbright

 

63 thoughts on “Comments – Saying Nothing At All – Poetry

  1. Well, we suppose it’s the attitude of the blogger which make people comment or follow. We don’t mind quick likes as we sometimes have no time neither. Isn’t it a bit moralistic to tell visitors to your blog how to behave? We are not students any more. Our dear Master studied communication attitudes of bloggers and we found out as more moralistic or ideological set a blog is as less respond the posts get. The bloggosphere – and the net in general – has to do with freedom and not with set minds.
    So, if you reflect about LIKEs and followers you have to start analysing your communication attitutes and not look at other, we suppose.
    All the best and good luck
    the Fab Four of Cley

    Like

  2. Hi E.D. I must confess there are times when I have been a quick liker on people’s blogs…without commenting. I have as of late felt a deeper conviction about being more authentic and interacting with others. Sometimes I need time to digest what others are expressing, but I also find it overwhelming being in the virtual world and the time it consumes. I have thought that on this issue of authenticity it is very important to prioritize and structure things to minimize that feeling into realistic steps that truly encourage ‘sharing like-minded interests and building a blogging community.’ I have had more and more a deeper need for community in my life and struggle to always know the right path to take in the building process. It can be a bit painful when you are facing yourself and acknowledging old perspectives that don’t work anymore. Nevertheless, I would like to explore the process and try to build a more open and warm atmosphere for those who come to visit me while at the same time give back to that same community. I am thankful for this positive challenge and reminder that I found in the way you fly your own true colors. Peace and light.

    Like

    1. thank you. There is a group-mind on w.p. not unlike that on f.b. – best to keep to a few blogs you really love and forget the rest. The amount of likes you receive is not overly meaningful, without a sincere feeling of being read and enjoyed. We are all guilty of speedy likes, and then we realize how shallow it is, we begin all over again. Conversation is much more valuable.. thanks eve

      Like

  3. Hi Eve, followed the link you left on OM’s blog.
    I quite agree with this post, and like you I’m a lot more interested in comments than like and can’t help but wonder why the followers don’t say a thing. I’ve personally had to encourage those around me who talk about liking my blog to say something, their thoughts, anything at all related. It helps me know what you’re thinking and relate better.

    This post has been helpful. Thank you 🙂

    P.S is that you on your gravatar? You’re beautiful.

    Like

    1. No, I am not that child. My years are much older.. My photos is on the blog, down the right hand side. Thanks so much for your comment. So appreciate it. eve

      Like

    2. even after this sticky post has been up for sometime, still hardly a comment on any other post – i take it they are just too busy. The best thing to do is after awhile, you only keep the blogs on your reader that you, yourself, really enjoy and comment upon. The likes are on their own, time and time over, are just like a thumbs up on facebook – just a quick acknowledgement. thanks eve

      Like

  4. I’m having difficulty encouraging people to comment on my blog as well. Asking questions hasn’t worked for me so far in trying to encourage dialogue, but I’ll keep trying 🙂 I do understand why people prefer to click the Like button over commenting. Making meaningful comments isn’t as easy as it seems. I definitely make an effort to say more than “Great post!” but it can be quite challenging. For me the challenge may be b/c of spontaneous “stage fright” or perfectionism/writer’s block. Like you, I appreciate receiving Likes. They’re nice little gifts. But when I Like someone’s post it’s only if I’ve actually read it. Liking someone’s post without actually having read it would be a disservice, among other things. Oh, I love the video you include at the conclusion of your post. It complements the theme of your message very well. It made me smile and brought back memories of hearing Alison Krauss’ sweet voice over the airwaves all the time when that song came out.

    Like

    1. Hi Grace, I know where you are coming from, I have been blogging for a long, long time. The problem maybe down to people being overwhelmed with blogs from the reader etc. Word Press has set up a process that is difficult for most people to follow. It is truly O.T.T.and not really “comment” friendly. If you get what I mean.. eve – thanks for adding your two cents. eve

      Like

  5. I didn’t have time at the moment to read all the comments but I wanted to leave a few thoughts for now. First of all, I didn’t know about the Facebook link. I don’t use Facebook any more and I’m not into self-publicizing. It’s a shame that other people are so motivated by numbers rather than by quality but, hey, what can you do?
    Secondly, I used to have a blog that was primarily about meditation and Buddhism. Nobody was interested. Now I save those discussions for my real-life sangha. So I agree with you that people aren’t so interested in spiritual blogs. It doesn’t mean that there aren’t interested people out there, they’re just hard to find.
    Finally, I’ve started to feel like a part of a WordPress community and it feels nice. I took a blogging break recently and I missed my blogging friends. I know that I’ve neglected you Eve and I’m sorry for that. Please know that it isn’t personal – it’s just a reflection of how chaotic my life is at the moment. 🙂 When you commented on my blog it gave me the nudge I needed to come and check in with you. I hope you had a lovely holiday. I also hope that we can make each other part of our blogging communities. 🙂

    Like

    1. I don’t know why but I see two replies to this comment in my WordPress menu but I can’t see them here.
      I’m sorry to hear that you’re finding life difficult at the moment. I hope things improve for you soon.
      I’m not sure that our blogs are that similar. I mostly blog about things I make and a few daily life posts and re-blogs. I recently snuck in a few posts about a Buddhist monk but I made them about his art and poetry. My old blog was more spiritual and it bombed. 🙂 Don’t let it get you down. There will be people liking your posts because they really do genuinely like them. I think community is like love, it kind of sneaks up on you when you’re not forcing it.

      Like

  6. Indeed a lot of “followers” could be robots! 😦 programmed or triggered to click likes based on certain words. Well. Who cares? I don’t know your blog well enough yet to “comment” but I’ll come back. (I like the little girl’s picture!) Meantime: have a great week-end or whatever’s left of it in your time zone!
    Be good (or bad if that’s more fun!)
    brian

    Like

  7. WordPress has made it much more difficult to go to the actual post, this is because they have made the reader feed too complicated: first one must click on the title of the post, then, one must click on “go to original post”; since they did this it’s hard to find the time to comment, so I think many people just give up and do a like instead.

    As for comments, I think I am one of the few people on wordpress that only has comments and likes open for short periods; I find that comments on poems can detract [after awhile] from the poem, because poems are very much like a song — everyone has their own interpretation.
    I have noticed that when I did leave comments up — people would say very similar things so in the end it left no room for imagination for those who come and see the post much later.

    Much to my surprise, people who no longer have blogs because they have either stopped posting or deleted their blogs, still have “instant delivery” set for one or both of my blogs and they often leave me a comment in the “Contact” page, saying how much they are enjoying my work.

    This is why I think it’s important to send the entire post when posting; some people only send out a portion and one needs to go to their blog to read/see the rest.

    Like

    1. Word press is becoming an extension of Face book. The likes are just the same as “thumbs up” with comments just a few words, as you say each similar to one another. The whole point to blogging was to gain an audience in the outside world, and not by a reader, but of course, with the hoops and hurdles, plus other endless information word press expects from people before they can comment, makes the process impossible. I have had a few people tell me they don’t want to join word press to comment. I don’t blame them. Thus, the set up (reader) by word press for bloggers circles is a bit odd and totally worthless for many. (described in other comments here.) – I might turn my likes off soon. I had them off for the longest time before, when I relied more on a google audience. I still do better from outsiders via visitors, who make the blogging effort worth while. Thanks for your thoughts. eve

      Like

      1. Yes, wordpress has very much becoming an extension of facebook. In fact, wordpress has it set so that a person’s ‘followers’
        are counted here on wordpress along with the ‘followers’ on facebook and twitter.
        Which is why I turned off ‘follow blog’ on both of my blogs; it’s absurd — some people show that they have over 50 thousand followers, when in fact, on wordpress, they only have 3 or 4 hundred — the rest are all the followers on their facebook page; and get this… all it takes is a ‘like’ on their facebook page, to be counted a ‘follower’ on wordpress too!

        Like

        1. thanks for those details. I had no idea. Will read your comment again tomorrow, as just come back from a long trip to Honfleur, Normandy Fr. (will take some time to catch my breath. ) thanks again. eve

          Like

  8. This is such a helpful post Eve…. and I appreciate how it has sparked more discussion and insights from others. The Blogoshere is such a curious and interesting place. Like life, its easy to get sucked into it with judgments and attachments … Its a great place to practice vairagya 😉
    Val x

    Like

  9. yes, i always wondered how i could receive near-instant ‘likes’ on a post i had just put up 30 seconds b4 the like arrived – thanx for the heads-up on this issue. wish wordpress had a way to ‘weed’ out those who are just harvesting ‘likes’ 😛

    Like

  10. If you look at the “What’s Hot” box in your Dashboard, there’s a “Latest” tab that I’ve long suspected is the source of some of those instant likes. I’ve gotten Likes within seconds of posting a new article, and there’s no way anyone could have read and decided they liked the post. Most of such do turn out to be what sure looks like bloggers trying to generate traffic to their own blog.

    My blog is extremely esoteric and eclectic, so it’s not surprising I don’t get a lot of real traffic, and yet somehow I manage to have over a 1000 followers. I’m quite sure nearly all of those supposed followers were seeking traffic to their own blog. I have both a comment policy and a follow policy. The latter makes clear what types of blogs I’m likely (or not) to follow, and goes on to say that I’m most likely to follow those who interact with me on my blog — that is, who actively comment.

    I can’t speak for others, but if I click the [Like] button, to me that is a, “Good post, I liked that!” comment. The blogs I follow regularly, I try to find some aspect of the post to comment about and start a mini-conversation. (My online history goes back to the mid-1980s when all we did was interact with each other… at great length… sometimes for months on end… about a single topic! 😀 )

    Like

    1. Thank you for your comment. Your viewpoint is shared by us. I will go and check out the what’s hot and see for myself what is happening. I, like you, write a spiritual blog, and to be honestly truthful people are not that interested in the genre, I suppose. Also Word Press themselves, do not encourage “esoteric” sort of blogs anyway. How many have you seen in freshly pressed? I see the odd token spiritually inclined blog, now and again. Most of the more popular blogs, are all about how people spend their time and/or poetry/writing and photography,. These types of blogs do well. I can’t write poetry, so damned!!! Might I ask who placed the “What’s hot box” on w. p.? The staff? Why have they made such an app. on our blogs? Just don’t understand this at all. Thank you so much.. kindly eve (I have been busy in the garden on a hot afternoon.So excuse my writing.)

      Like

      1. Yes, ha, good point about “Freshly Pressed.” I was FP’d once (in over 350 posts in almost exactly three years). It wasn’t original material, but some old thing from my files about Santa Claus. And despite all the people who Liked and Commented, none stuck around as regulars.

        It may be that one problem with posts about spirituality is that, although people throughout the world overwhelming identify as spiritual, there are so many different ways of climbing that mountain (I love how Gandhi said there were as many religions as people). And it’s often not something even spiritual people think much about, let alone discuss.

        There is the idea that the lowest form of discussion is about other people — gossip, basically. The next level is about things. That covers a lot of ground from science to art to architecture. The highest level is about ideas, and in today’s fast-paced world, that’s a very hard level for many.

        Sadly, to the extent one writes about ideas, one tends to be a lonely blogger (or so it seems to me).

        Worse, although Twitter and Facebook are great tools for connectivity, they don’t encourage thoughtful discussion. On that account I worry that they affect how people think.

        But then, I’m an old fart, so I get to look askance at all this new-fangled technology and, occasionally yell, “Got off my lawn, you dang kids!!” 😛

        Like

        1. Yes, entirely agree with you.. There are a few great groups on FB. One I belong to Light-keepers inspires greatly.This group is hosted by an Oxford Don, with a degree in philosophy. The group is a secret one.. I’ve found the What’s Hot button, yes a good tool for fooling with eh? – and I have been fooled. Must agree with Gandhi, there are as many roads to the Godhead as people. Yes, of course there are. I have tried very hard to make that point on this blog. I don’t think I have managed to much inspire. Yes, also age is a factor and experiences garnered. thanks so much. keep in touch. I am off to have a cuppa tea.. A chai. yvonne

          Like

    2. I really like the latter part of your comment. Now,I will have to do something similar on my blog, that is, let them know my policy. Now how to figure out a policy, will have to dig deep into my intuition for that one.I really, really, want those fakes to stop using my blog for their harvesting. thanks again.

      Like

      1. The problem is getting the reflexive followers and likers to actually read the follow policy! I tried to make mine fairly obvious, but maybe I should rename it to “READ ME FIRST!!!!” 😀

        http://logosconcarne.com/disclaimer/

        It is possible to have a “sticky” post that always stays on top as your first post. I have another blog where I’m trying that, but even that hasn’t done much to block the non-following followers. (And that blog just documents a project of mine, so there’s no way anyone is actually interested.)

        http://bookofbool.com/

        Like

        1. I cannot but wonder why folks try to fool us? What are they actually getting out of liking post and following blogs that are of no interest? I mean how shallow! How false! How stupid!!! – I mean they do get caught out in the end. My blog post this week re: “Comments” is only one of many that have been posted recently highlighting this issue. I guess the moment word-press introduced the “like” button, all was lost in the sincere blogoshere world. I can only guess they introduced the “like” button because the stupid thumbs-up click is so successful on FB.

          Like

          1. I’m okay with Likes, per se — easier than a one-line, “Great post!” comment. But tools are often easily used against our favor rather than in. The lowly telephone, so important for contact, also opens the door to telemarketing. Two edges to every sword, I guess.

            Like

  11. it’s quite possible that your blog is like that amazing book you keep by the bed but have yet to delve into. You’ve scanned the pages and know you will read it at some point – and in the mean time you just find comfort in knowing it is there for you when the time is right for giving it your full attention.
    🙂

    Like

    1. smile, well i hardly think so. Who is going to remember where the book is! This is a public blog.. I also could say the same for all the blogs I follow. Easy peasy not to comment and just like. It is akin to those FB friends who “befriend” you without introducing themselves via the private message. They don’t even use the courtesy of saying a hello. They are asking to be friends without even an introduction… lol thanks eve

      Like

  12. Eve, I agree with you and I am glad you answered that long ago comment.bi try hard to comment and to get to know my readers and what makes them tick.years ago, I realized I can’t expect people to do things as I would. I try to reply to all comments and try to visit everyone even if they aren’t in the reader at that time. It takes quite a lot of time but it is worth it if I can help the world. I just have to start making more time for painting. Since I have started writing, I have had less time for painting and other media. Hugs to you and I will return. Sincerely, Barbara

    Like

    1. Hello Barbara, thanks for commenting again. Yes, I was ill at the time of that HRC post, also had little idea on the “whys and wherefores of W.P. reader etc. etc.” Thus, missed out on returning comments sometimes. I am now much more aware of the blogosphere – sort of “clued” in, and what a crafty world it can be sometimes!!!! All the same, I am happy blogging – I do hope my most recent post was apt.. Yes, best to make time for other hobbies. My thoughts too.. very best and fondly eve

      Like

  13. Some good points here. It is difficult at times to devote the time to read blogs fully, but I do try to comment as much as I can. Like you I believe this is an important part of building a blogging community.

    Like

    1. Thank you so much marjma.. I think i have already written on previous comments the reasons, why i wrote this post. We cannot comment on each and every post, but at least sometimes, even if a few words. Someone told me to always try and give time to 4-5 blogs a day – no more than that. Then to leave well meaning comments. (Quality over quantity.) But even 5 blogs is a bit too much, I think. It depends how busy one is.. thanks again. eve

      Like

  14. Sometimes when I’m scanning the Reader, and I’m on a public library computer, and have like ten seconds before my time is up, I’ll “like” something just to book mark it for reading later. Now that’s a speedy “like”! Have a good day…

    Like

    1. Yes, you have a point. I find I can only read one or two blogs a day. I cannot do any blog justice when I have more on the reader than I can sincerely enjoy, or lose myself in. I guess that goes for all of us. I am changing my reader to only those blogs i can read with ease – word length of between 200-700 words.. I cannot read more text than that. I think that goes for most people. Bloggers out there with 100 or more likes, I often wonder about. Don’t you?

      Like

      1. We definitely must pick and chose. There’s so much out there. As for those with a hundred or more likes on a post, yes, there’s a lot to wonder about. Like you, I like it a bit more cozy…

        Like

  15. Hi E.D.!

    You recently “liked” a jingle I wrote entitled “Tomb” and I was real glad you liked it. You and a little girl from India both liked it. She downright near took ownership of it with all her little faces & comments (also reconstituted it on her own blog in India) & I walked around for about three weeks thrilled about that. You seem to be very thoughtful & discrete about what you “like”. I’m always thrilled whenever you “like” anything I do.

    Now, there is something I’ve done recently that I’d really like you to take a look at and maybe heartlessly critique. It’s just photos and very subjective. Your opinion is highly valued by me. I’m pretty thick skinned so have no mercy with this one if you decide to drop by and give it a gander ~

    https://oldtimerchronicle2.wordpress.com/2014/06/18/captn-fiddlers-sufi-bubble

    It’s a promo for my “Afghaneeland” series. I hope you don’t mind me linking it here. This is the best of which I’m capable & am really interested in your opinion because you are such an awesomely positive direction-ed entity.

    Love to you!

    Like

  16. Hi, Thanks for visiting my blog. I have had some of these thoughts myself but I also, at times, ‘like’ without comment. In fact, I’m going to try to figure out how to put one of those ‘like the comment’ buttons on my page. Sometimes I find when visiting others that, if a post has a lot of comments, so much has already been said that I like what another commenter has said, if you know what I mean. I’m actually inclined to over comment if there;’s such a thing – go on a bit, you know. But only when I have something to say. Otherwise I read and like to acknowledge that I’ve read it and liked it.
    On the subject of ‘ghost’ followers, it is a bit of a pain. I’ve kinda worked out that about 4 out of every hundred followers is about what to expect for visits and likes and even that depends on what is posted. So I could be up or down around 40 or so based on 1000ish followers.
    I did go into the reader the other night, went on to ‘blogs I follow’ and clicked on every one. Some of them no longer existed or haven’t posted in over 6 months or nine months. I deleted loads because I don’t want to promise to follow until I am sure that I can actually do so time wise. I hadn’t even noticed that those particular ones had gone. But I didn’t know that in the beginning. Initially, I thought you refollowed someone if they followed you! But I was a total newbie to the whole idea of blogging so I forgave myself!
    I wouldn’t be too disillusioned as I think sometimes people are just busy or they’re using a phone to catch up and that’s a nightmare to make comments on. Heck, I can’t even ‘like’ on my phone without it taking forever to load.
    I try to be very faithful to those blogs I follow but habits and tastes do change in terms of what you’re interested, for example, when I started I didn’t read so many poetry blogs now they make up a large part of those I follow. Not all, by any means, but I’ve grown towards them as time has gone on. It’s a bugger too to keep track of the emails or to go for the reader. I either end up missing loads on the reader or become overwhelmed by emails if I don’t keep on top of it daily. It could be a full-time job! Wouldn’t mind that actually. 😉
    Anyway, I hope you don’t get put off by lack of comments. It’s only one part of it really, I suppose, although, yeah it is frustrating if you’ve put yourself out there and nobody says peep. All the best. I’ll get back in to have a mooch around but, right now I have to catch up on reading posts. Full-time job, I’m telling you. Wonder if anyone is hiring. 🙂 x

    Like

    1. thank you so much. 🙂 I am trying to weed out the speedy likers, due to not wanting to cont. visiting the reader feeling i must read their blogs. I would rather have fewer likes, and less followers, so i can spend quality time with sincere bloggers who want companionship and have like-minded interests. Hence, the reason I have posted this angst today. thank you again. eve

      Like

        1. cetainly a most sincere efforts as this cannot go un-noticed for very long – hang in there – success is just around the corner !

          Like

  17. This post may not have to do with spirituality or photography but it was especially valuable to me in getting a perspective on why one blogs. I admit to being a ‘speed liker’. I like because “I liked it”, but didn’t have time to post. Or, my ‘like’ is more of a nod of acknowledgement and I really don’t have much more to add.

    Like

    1. re: speedy liking is a phrase used for people who do not read at all. Like they press the like button before or just the minute the post is published. (Of course without time to read or take in the content of a post.) Over 8 months I have observed this procedure with care and attn. Mostly it is the same people who do the likes over and over again. We all have times when we like – without commenting. It is only natural not to want to comment each and every time.. Somethings appeal, others do not. Time is an issue. What I am pointing out here, is some people never never never comment, but always like.. Now that is a tad bit suspicious. Sometimes it only takes a few words to comment, even if it is only a few words like: “great post, thanks..” It means, at least to me, well you really did read it.. Thanks tami for your comment. You often do comment, and I take it as a gift of kindness. Namaste. xxx

      Like

  18. Well said ! i always suspected tht there were automatic robots behind the scenes that did what i would call “automatic likes” – now what’s the point of that ? Are they just trying to support us, do they even read the posts or is there another agenda to gain followers for their own brand of subject matter ?

    Like

    1. Yes, there are robots, out there liking posts. Not sure how they do it. I would like to know. Also there are rascals who “like” to be liked back. Most of us have had such encounters with these so called bloggers. Sadly, one does not know about this when beginning blogging, it takes a lot of time to expose them. Actually it takes months to sort out true followers from the false. It is a sad shame, because it particularly plays on the more vulnerable among us. Most of my audience does not come from word press folks, but from google searches.. Most of those do not have an account with Word Press, and due to Word Press policies of wanting every details about your life before allowing you to comment, I miss out on a lot of people who would otherwise support the blog.. I have been told this much by my friends through emails and Facebook. thanks eve.

      Like

      1. I get a lot of views from outside wordpress from facebook and twitter especially — not every day but when someone there posts a link… they rarely make a comment and can’t click like. It is the same but different at facebook though. I have nearly as many friends (different mostly) and they all like even less frequently than wordpress users – although I get the feeling they do look at what they click on like about.

        Like

          1. The pouting kid new image is cute – I think you fit more the goddess image myself.
            I am planning to post a third on fractal research soon.
            Maybe only a few wil see it and less will actually run the video but it is another piece of the nature of expansive awareness that you in part stimulated in me to find with your enthusiasm for the sacred geometry. I shall always be thankful for our blog friendship Eve.
            ~ Eric

            Like

          2. I am working on a biological connection to fractals this week — However, I wonder if you looked at this:

            Fractals: The Colors of Infinity
            Arthur C. Clark

            Video Description
            Arthur C. Clarke presents this unusual documentary on the mathematical discovery of the Mandelbrot Set (M-Set) in the visually spectacular world of fractal geometry.

            This show relates the science of the M-Set to nature in a way that seems to identify the hand of God in the design of the universe itself. Dr. Mandelbrot in 1980 discovered the infinitely complex geometrical shape called the Mandelbrot Set using a very simple equation with computers and graphics.

            The Mandelbrot set – someone has called it the thumb-print of God – is one of the most beautiful and remarkable discoveries in the entire history of mathematics.

            With Arthur C. Clarke as narrator and interviews with a number of notable mathematicians, including Benoît Mandelbrot, this program graphically illustrates how simple formulas can lead to complicated results: it explains the set, what it means, its internal consistency, and the revolutions in thought resulting from its discovery. Asked if the real universe goes on forever, Stephen Hawking defines its limit of smallness; the Mandelbrot set, on the other hand, may go on forever.

            The invention of the silicon chip in the 1970’s created a revolution in computers and communication and hence transformed our way of life. We are now seeing another revolution which is going to change our view of the universe and give us a better understanding of its’ working.

            The film explores the fractal universe helped by: Professor Ian Stewart of the Mathematics Institute, University of Warwick, an author of over 100 published scientific works; Dr. Michael Barnsley, former professor of mathematics at Georgia Institute of Technology who received a 2.5 million dollar government grant in 1991 to develop a fractal image compression systems.

            Like

          3. thanks for the you tube and details. Did you watch the beautiful vimeo film on the previous post. It is a stunner.. So well made.. Why not use it on your blog? eve previous post Magical Mystery Tour in Fractals…..

            Like

Hope to hear from you!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s