We Don’t “Cook” Easily – Spirituality

There is a story about an old Zen monk who was dying, who had finished everything and was about to get off the wheel. He was just floating away, free and in his pure Buddha-mind, when a thought passed by of a beautiful deer he had once seen in a field. And he held on to that thought for just a second because of its beauty, and immediately he took birth again as a deer. It’s as subtle as that. It’s like when we begin to see the work that is to be done, and we go to an ashram or a monastery, or we hang out with satsang. We surround ourselves with a community of beings who think the way we think. And then none of the stuff, the really hairy stuff inside ourselves, comes up. It all gets pushed underground.
We can sit in a temple or a cave in India and get so holy, so clear and radiant, the light is pouring out of us. But when we come out of that cave, when we leave that supportive structure that worked with our strengths but seldom confronted us with our weaknesses, our old habit-patterns tend to reappear, and we come back into the same old games – the games we were sure we had finished with. Why? Because there were uncooked seeds, seeds of desires that sprout again the minute they are stimulated. We can stay in very holy places, and the seeds sit there dormant and uncooked. But there is fear in such individuals, because they know they’re still vulnerable.
Nothing goes under the rug. We can’t hide in our highness any more than we’ve hidden in our unworthiness. If we’ve finally decided we want God, we’ve got to give it all up. The process is one of keeping the ground as we go up, so we always have ground, so that we’re high and low at the same moment – that’s a tough game to learn, but it’s a very important one. So at the same moment that if I could, I would like to take us all up higher and higher, so we can see that the game isn’t to get high – the game is to get balanced and liberated.
– Ram Dass – excerpt from Grist for the Mill.

21 thoughts on “We Don’t “Cook” Easily – Spirituality

  1. Uncooked seeds, the delusional and the charlatans – what a fine mess the misconstrued promises of spirituality bring. As with religion more generally though, we make a great mistake if we throw the baby out with the bath water of course. It is such a shame that the accretions we form along our path to higher understanding so often result only in the destruction of that same path. As to The Beatles, then George Harrison (who I knew) most certainly was not an uncooked seed Eve; a great man indeed. Hariod. ❤

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      1. Oh, that is really wonderful Eve; it created lovely feelings within me. Ravi was once with George at Friar Park when I was there in the studio (sitar lessons!); and you can see the great affection the two had for each other in the video you post here. Yes, he was a sweet soul, though more than that Eve, he was a great human being (nothing to do with The Beatles).

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        1. Ahhh! Ravi, I met him one day in Sai towers Hotel in Puttaparthi, India. He was sitting in the cafe drinking coffee, between darshans. He was gracious enough to give me his autograph. That was way back in 1991. I don’t think Ravi had any particular guru though. His guru was his music and his discipline. Re: Hare Krishna Movement. Actually, I am quite fond of reading books about the Hare Krishna Movement, although I am not part of their org. in any way. I did read the life story of Srila Prabhupada, (the founder of the Hare Krishna’s.) It turned out to be a fascinating read. There’s no doubt Srila was a great soul. He’d left his native India at the age of 69 to travel on a cargo boat to the USA. During the voyage he had two heart attacks but survived. He arrived in New York with very few rupees but with a great deal of faith. He managed somehow to set up a small Krishna Centre in one of the worst suburbs of New York City.Of course his absolute devotion to Krishna, along with his determination to spread Krishna Consciousness were to be wholly fruitful. Although, of course, like most spiritual movements, The Hare Krishna’s had their down side. Recently I’ve read another book “The Journey Home” about another Krishna disciple. – Radhanath Swami, also a disciple of Srila Prabhupada. He is a well known Swami nowadays. Here is one of his discourses.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YpEIOHmIkXY

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          1. I clearly remember the first & last time I saw Pt Ravi Shankar in Parthi. It was during evening darshan. We were in the portico. Baba had just come back from his darshan round and was entering his room. Ravi Shankar, although he hadn’t been called, attempted to follow Baba into the room but was politely “blocked” by Mr Khial Das, who used to follow Baba on his rounds. Very very awkward actually, especially if u happen to be a world famous celebrity!! I don’t know whether Ravi Shankar got an interview or not. But I don’t think he came again. This must have been in the year you mention.

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          2. Thanks Ramesh! an unexpected piece of history. George Harrison used to visit too. But did not return after 1990. His guru was Krishna eh? 🙂 Eve

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  2. I know this a much abused terms but I think it all boils down to “Karma” or the “correct time.” In other words when the seeds are fully cooked, the “true light” happens. Till then…..
    I know of one such case, a devotee (now no more) who underwent the most amazing spiritual transformation almost from the moment he came into Sai’s fold. Yet remained completely anonymous — no books, lectures, etc.

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    1. Thanks Ramesh, Yes I have heard of similar cases.. People are all so different.. I remember Sai saying, people came to him for all sorts of reasons, not just spiritual. Eve

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    1. yes true. i had years around a popular guru and although it was a wonderful experience at the time, i came away without much true light. I did not come away empty handed, as i’d given it my best. Would i do it again? no. I saw too much of delusional and fanciful folk and too much of co-dependency that really bothered me. There are sincere seekers in India, (I am talking of Westerners ) but they are unlikely to visit well-known gurus. They seem to find their destiny by going it alone. Now how they survive in the wilds of India – I do not know. However, many do. I shall post a you tube of a true seeker for your interest. Thanks for your interest in this post. Eve p.s. this comment is being written on a dinky lap top – so hope it is okay with you. x

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      1. (Your comment came out fine.) I’ve long believed that, if a spiritual path can mean anything, it has to be possible to find it alone. I simply don’t believe in the idea of a spiritual path that requires someone else to help you find it.

        That doesn’t mean teaching isn’t helpful. We don’t even learn to ride bikes or drive cars without teaching, but if a path is available to all — even those isolated from teachers — then it must be possible to find it alone.

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        1. There are those like Ram Dass or Jack Cornfield who do find the right teachers and progress well along the spiritual path, and later become teachers themselves. I am sure these people would have made it anyway. It is not always the path that is wrong, nor always the guru who is wrong, it is our inability to grasp what we are looking for. Most of us are not up to full time discipleship. We have to be ready and when we are the “way” is made open to us. I don’t think that Hindu gurus or Buddhist monks are anymore of a threat to our sanity in this particular area, than those affiliated to the Christian church. All have their pit-falls, don’t you think? Eve

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      2. “yes true. i had years around a popular guru and although it was a wonderful experience at the time, i came away without much true light.”
        Same here E.D. I guess the uncooked seeds came in the way !!!
        Nice post.

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        1. “Hierarchy” was a nasty part of Sai’s ashram. What people needed most was a true example of those teachings – but as the years rolled on, the good examples were very few and far between. It was a darned shame, not to mention confusing to many a seeker. Oh well! I am sure those who got the message kept quiet and out the way, we only heard from those with loud voices and big egos.. 😉

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          1. There were and are many true examples of those teachings but necessarily involved with the ashram or even the Sai organization. This is true of most religions I would say. Real devotees aren’t attracted to any of that anyway.

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