Is God Real? – Faith

There are people of different religions; each of them has faith. How do I treat the faith of somebody else?  This question has been high-lighted by the recent awful events here in France, and shows no signs of being solved. So what is faith? When I wish to speak about faith what is it I want to speak about? What is faith, is it an emotion? If so, what sort of emotion? Is it a state of mind? Or is is just a matter-of-fact “Here I am and I believe in something.” In through the Looking-glass,” The Red Queen says to Alice, “Why , sometimes, I’ve believed in six impossible things before breakfast.” So is faith this – believing in impossible things? When the early Latin writers wrote about Jews, they spoke about the “superstition” of Judaism. Is the faith of somebody else  a superstition? Is God real?  People make some choices about belief. If I believe in god: Believing in God is not just a simple statement without any obligation. It has all kinds of unpleasant ramifications – even to how I see my own life and my own experiences. Now some people will say that they are believers – and you find this in every religion,  because it doesn’t cost them anything. For them to say “yes” and “no” is quite equal. The point is, in what do I believe? -Or what do you believe? Your comments are welcome. thanks eve
~ taken from a few notes on faith: ~ Adin Steinsaltz
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Here is an excerpt from Hazrat Inayat Khan – The Purpose of Life ( This could read ‘The Purpose of faith’.)
A man may say, “We are here to gain honor.” In this case someone has to be humbled in order to give him the honor he seeks; but he in his turn may have to be humbled by a still more ardent seeker of honor.We may think that being loved is all-important, but we should know that the beauty in ourselves which makes another love us is transient. Furthermore the beauty we possess may pale in comparison with the beauty of another. When we seek the love of another we are not only dependent upon their love, but are ourselves devoid of love. If we think that it is desirable to love someone who deserves our love, we are mistaken, for we are always liable to be disappointed in the object of our love, who may perhaps never prove to be our ideal. One is led to suppose and believe that virtue is the only thing that matters in life, but it will be found that the greater number of sufferers from moral hallucination are to be met with among the self-righteous.
Then the only purpose of our life here on earth, if there be any, is the successful attainment of life’s demands. It may seem strange at first sight that all which life demands should be allowable and worth-while attaining; but on a closer study of life we see that the demands of our external self are the only ones we know, and we are ignorant of the demands of the true self, our inner life.
For instance, we know that we want good food and nice clothes, comfort of living and every convenience for moving about; honor, possessions, and all necessary means for the satisfaction of our vanity, all of which for the moment appear to us as our life’s only demands; but neither they nor their joy remain with us constantly. We then come to think that what we had was but a little and that perhaps more would satisfy us, and still more would suffice our need; but this is not so. Even if the whole universe were within our grasp it would be impossible fully to satisfy our life’s demands. This shows that our true life has quite different demands from those with which we are familiar. It does not want the joy experienced by this individual self only; it desires joy from all around. It does not wish for a momentary peace, but for one that is everlasting. It does not desire to love a beloved held in the arms of mortality. It needs a beloved to be always before it. It does not want to be loved only for today and perhaps not tomorrow. It wishes to float in the ocean of love. It is therefore that the Sufi seeks God as his love, lover and beloved, his treasure, his possession, his honor, his joy, his peace; and this attainment in its perfection alone fulfills all demands of life both here and hereafter.
Then again it may be said, there is a purpose above each purpose, and there is again a purpose under each purpose; and yet beyond and beneath all purposes there is no purpose. The creation is, because it is. Life is a journey from one pole to another, and the perfection of the conscious life is the final destiny of the imperfect life. In other words, every aspect of life in this world of variety gradually evolves from imperfection to perfection; and if life’s evolution were not so in its nature, there would be no difference between life and death, for life on the surface is nothing but the phenomena of contrast. This, then, is another way of expressing what is the purpose of life.

33 thoughts on “Is God Real? – Faith

  1. o yes about the light body it sounds absolutely true. in fact recently i heard the light body gave a talk and also accepted letters in Australia. will give you the details. and also a book has been written about the experiences with the light body. will give details later as i download them on my laptop

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  2. Despite the fact that I relinquished my former “organized religion” as a Roman Catholic, I still believe that “Loving thy neighbor as thyself” pretty much covers the commandments. And with what ever power-of-prayer elements I held onto along with interest in nature, I have felt a greater satisfaction in this life– including a positive hope of an afterlife. Nice post, E.D.

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    1. thanks for the comment, i do so agree. Organized religion needs to move on to meet the needs of the many – and not the commands of an out of date book. I do like the new Pope though. He seems so much more sensible about life in general.. 🙂 Eve

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  3. God to me is a constant good, constant hope, constant entity to rely upon and no “God”, in whatever earthly religion, seeks men to take up vengeance or violence against another human being in His name… the purpose of life is to me a purpose to live it and “do unto others as you would have them do unto you”… I am the last to call the Islamic terrorists in Paris “imperfections” of the faith – pure evil whose only faith it to overpower “Allah”/God Himself …

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    1. True: The light of the world does seem at times, to be dimly lit. When even lighting a candle does not seem to add much – this is the age of Kali Yuga, the dark age of mankind. The next cycle whenever that may be, is the dawning of the Satya Yuga, the age of truth, according to the Hindu Faith.. sigh! I have to have faith in that.. Thanks for your comment. Eve 🙂

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        1. the world goes in cycles according to the Hindu faith. I think each new age is marked by destruction on earth, and a new beginning from the beginning again. We will not witness this in our present form, i don’t think. The earth goes dormant for many millions of years between ages. Eve

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          1. Sathya Sai Baba told His students in Kodaicanal, in 2007 that the Golden Age would begin in 2012. in an interview Dr Srikanth Sola mentions this fact. see this interview please where at around 40 minutes Dr Sola says this:

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      1. OUR TRANSFORMATION BEGINS
        In an interview on Radio Sai, Dr. Sola
        stated that it was mentioned that Sai
        Baba stated that the Sathya yuga
        (Golden Age) begins on December
        2012.
        Dr. Sola said: “I remember once
        back in 2007, Swami was in
        Kodaikanal, this was shared with me
        by some of His students. Swami just
        casually remarked, ‘Sathya yuga
        begins in 2012.’ He said it so casually
        as if He would say it rains during
        monsoon season, and so we know
        that we’re at the end of one age and
        at the beginning of the next. This is
        why we have the triple incarnation
        of Shirdi Sai, Sathya Sai, Prema Sai!”
        What a wonderful time in which
        we are living and knowing that God
        had incarnated on Earth, and the
        change from the Kali yuga to the
        Sathya yuga is taking place… the
        transformation of Heaven on Earth!

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        1. yes, but at the moment the affects cannot be seen or noticed. People are tired and fedup. Still, it does need the people to wake up and pay attn.. They seem reluctant to bring about change – and there can be no Golden Age without people participation eh?Eve

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          1. Baba explained that when a rotating fan is switched off it takes a while to come to a stop. in the same way, though the Kali Age has been switched off it will take some time to come to a complete halt. It is said that between 2020 and 2030 peace will reign on earth. people need to be kind to each other in the meantime 🙂

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          2. there would have to major earth changes between now and 2020 before peace will begin. At the moment the one percent own half the world and we are all left in near poverty. They show no signs of giving up their wealth to help others.. The problem with Sai Baba, he was never clear – like on the date he died. He spoke in riddles but not to say he was not telling us something very valuable. I hope so. thanks again. Eve

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          3. by the way H. I have updated the light body post from last year. I have about 30 views on that every single day. A lot. Have you heard anymore on that subject? I guess Isaac and others are banned from PP due to their involvement with Muddenahalli. I have no news of that. I know the PP ashram are furious about the light body – (my Light Body post is still there if you wish to reread it.) eve

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  4. A very pertinent piece at this time, Eve. I feel like such a novice in these matters that I don’t think I have anything of value to say except that I’m glad that you shared your thoughts; thank you. They help me to probe my own thoughts/feelings on the matter – which are very confused and opaque.

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    1. Hi there Sarah, faith is a word we use every day in one way or another, and in small things faith has some value but it’s not earth-shaking. The Charlie Hebdo cartoons, when I actually saw them on line, were offensive. I had no idea, up until last week, France allowed that sort of thing, while even sanctioning their creation.I have learned that France, as a republic, puts the state first, while the beliefs held dear in all religions are considered sort of as subordinate and almost something to be sniffed at.The question of faith really did not come up or was spoken about until after the Paris event, when people began speaking about the cartoons as being offensive. Perhaps if Charlie Hebdo had thought through the question of what is faith, and where does it belong in modern life, and had themselves practiced some sort of self-censorship, those cartoonist might be alive today also others too. What a waste of life and what horror this has unleashed on us. God knows what the future will bring.. Eve ❤

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      1. I’m not sure that the situation is any better in countries where there is still is a link between church and state. Here in Ireland that link is still there and it is written into the constitution that Ireland is a Catholic country. This means that schoolchildren are expected to take part in many Catholic activities in school, and community life (at least here in the rural West) has the church at it’s heart. This can make life very hard for those of us who are not Catholics. There is a latent intolerance that raises its head when challenged. And when other faiths _are_ tolerated they are not necessarily respected.
        It is wrong to belittle other people’s faith but it is also wrong to kill. The whole situation is horrific. I have faith that all parties will judged by the ultimate arbiter when the time comes.

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        1. interesting about Ireland. I had no idea it is quite intolerant of others’ faith. I have just been watching Celtic Woman and thinking how well they sing their Irish songs. France, i assure you is very intolerant of outsiders – don’t for heaven’s sake come here and live – better the irish i feel, than the xenophobia that is very alive and well here. hugs eve (i am writing this while listening to eric clapton, hope there are no mistakes.)

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          1. The Irish have a reputation for being generous, happy-go-lucky, friendly and musical. All of that is well-deserved. However, like any humans they have their faults and my experience has been that, on their own turf and collectively, they can be unpleasantly intolerant. The attitude of some is that if we “blow-ins” don’t like it we shouldn’t have come to a Catholic country. That would be fair enough if it were as simple as that. I could go on but I won’t.
            Since being here I’ve vowed to never again move to a country that has a reputation for despising the English, and there are plenty of those. So I decided many years ago that I won’t be moving to France. Even though I’m Welsh, people think I’m English because of my accent and I get judged accordingly. Anyway, enough of the bitterness, I hope you find some sweetness in this new day. ❤

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      2. Well…as someone who came the States from Europe, I can say that many European societies are very secular and believe that one should be able to mock religious institutions and beliefs. While I can see where some of the Charlie Hebdo cartoons were a bit too vulgar, overall I tend to agree with that view…and I think faith *should* be subordinate to a secular society. That way the society can accommodate people of many different beliefs or none, without one religion taking over too much.

        That being said, I love the Sufis and that piece you shared from Hazrat Inayat Khan is beautiful. Thank you!

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  5. I rather like this as a shorthand description of faith Eve:

    “Belief is the insistence that the truth is what one would ‘lief’, meaning ‘will’, or ‘wish’, to be. Faith is an unreserved opening of the mind to the truth, whatever it may turn out to be. Faith has no preconceptions; it is a plunge into the unknown. Belief clings, but faith let’s go. Faith is the essential virtue of science, and likewise of any religion that is not self-deception”

    ― Alan W. Watts

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    1. Hello Hariod, what a lovely piece. I bet there is a you tube with the same out there on www. Alan had a way with words, didn’t he? – I did not want to post anything on the recent events – as per the news, but I felt a piece on faith rather fitted the bill. It is something we don’t often talk about or even think about and yet it is such a huge part of life for all of us.Faith should be respected I feel, as a sublime, (is that the right word?) part of human life, thus, not to be poked fun of. Well that is my view. Eve

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    2. I agree, great statement on the nature of faith! Christian theologians (and I imagine those of other religions) talk about “surrendering” to faith. Thomas Aquinus wrote that faith requires irrationality — faith is not rational, but comes from another place within us.

      (On the other hand, I’m not sure there’s anything in life that cannot be poked fun of. I’ve always viewed humor as one of god’s greatest gifts to his creations. Suffering drives us, but humor restores us.)

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      1. faith is something i cannot live without – i need that crutch in life. Anyway it is better than the news – thanks again for taking time to comment. eve

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        1. Likewise. It may turn out to all be a cruel fabrication, but I just don’t want to live in a cold and lifeless universe. Even if I am fooling myself, it’s a foolery I like and am very comfortable with. And while I’m pretty sure there’s no white-bearded god on a golden throne and St. Peter at the gate, who knows what’s really going on in this interesting universe!

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