Quotes From The Diamond Sutra – Inspirational Quotations

very good quotations on this you tube here, set to Western Choir Music.

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Short ‘edit’  from The Diamond Sutra

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“Subhuti, someone might fill innumerable worlds with the seven treasures and give all away in gifts of alms, but if any good man or any good woman awakens the thought of Enlightenment and takes even only four lines from this Discourse, reciting, using, receiving, retaining and spreading them abroad and explaining them for the benefit of others, it will be far more meritorious. Now in what manner may he explain them to others? By detachment from appearances-abiding in Real Truth. -So I tell you-Thus shall you think of all this fleeting world:A star at dawn, a bubble in a stream;A flash of lightening in a summer cloud,A flickering lamp, a phantom, and a dream.When Buddha finished this Discourse the venerable Subhuti, together with the bhikshus, bhikshunis, lay-brothers and sisters, and the whole realms of Gods, Men and Titans, were filled with joy by His teaching, and, taking it sincerely to heart they went their ways.”
-Siddhartha Gautama on the Diamond Sutra
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4 Secrets of the Diamond Sutra

  • The Diamond Sutra distills Buddhism’s central message that everything changes. It describes our fleeting world as a bubble in a stream.
  • Jack Kerouac was so influenced by the Diamond Sutra that he studied it daily for years and attempted his own rendition.
  • Brevity is one reason for the Diamond Sutra’s popularity. It can be recited in 40 minutes.
  • The Diamond Sutra of 868 A.D. is printed on paper, a material unknown in the West for another couple centuries.

A wonderful rendition of the Diamond  Sutra from Imee Ooi – although there is a minute or so of her speaking in her native language.

http://www.diamond-sutra.com/


Manjushri Mantra – Mantra And Meanings

 

Manjushri first appears in Buddhist literature in Mahayana sutras, in particular the Lotus Sutra, the Flower Ornament Sutra, and the Vimalakirti Sutra as as well as the Prajna Paramamita Sutra. (The Prajna Paramitata is actually a large collection of sutras that includes the Heart and Diamond Sutras.) He was popular in India by no later than the 4th century, and by the 5th or 6th century he had become one of the major figures of Mahayana iconography.

Although Manjushri does not appear in the Pali Canon, some scholars associate him with Pancasikha, a heavenly musician who appears in the Digha-nikaya of the Pali Canon.

Manjushri’s likeness is often found in Zen meditation halls, and he is an important deity in Tibetan tantra. Along with wisdom, Manjushri is associated with poetry, oratory and writing. He is said to have an especially melodious voice.

 

 

.manjurshribw

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Manjushri Mantra

Om A Ra Pa Ca Na Dhih

With a diacritic font installed, the mantra is transliterated thus:

Oṃ A Ra Pa Ca Na Dhīḥ

Manjushri is a Bodhisattva who represents wisdom, and his mantra also symbolizes that quality. He holds a sword in his right hand — symbolizing his ability to cut through delusion. In his left hand, by his heart, he holds the stem of a lotus flower, which bears a book — the Perfection of Wisdom teaching.

The syllables between Om and the concluding Dhiih are the first syllables of a syllabary called the arapacana because it begins with A RA PA CA and NA. (A syllabary is like an alphabet, but made up of syllables). This syllabary is found in a number of Buddhist texts, including some Perfection of Wisdom (prajñaparamita) texts. Many of the texts in which A RA PA CA NA (and the rest of the sylllabary) appears are not connected with Manjushri, but according to Dr. Conze (in the introduction to The Large Sutra on Perfect Wisdom) “in later literature is is always connected with the Bodhisattva Manjushri.”

The individual syllables A RA PA CA and NA have no conceptual meaning, although they are seen as having symbolic connections with various spiritual qualities.

Here’s the schema laid out in the Large Sutra of Perfect Wisdom (adapted from Conze):

A leads to the insight that the essence of all things is unproduced.

RA leads to the insight that all things are pure and free of defilements.

PA leads to the insight that all dharmas have been “expounded in the ultimate sense.”

CA leads to the insight that the arising and ceasing of things cannot be apprehended because in reality there is no arising or ceasing.

NA leads to the insight that although the names for things change the nature of things behind their names cannot be gained or lost.

These are all important concepts in the Perfection of Wisdom, although to say they are concepts is a bit limiting — really they’re attempts to describe the indescribable nature of reality.

Dhiih is defined as meaning:

Source for mantra  http://www.wildmind.org/mantras/figures/manjushri

 

blog fonts are being changed to suit the new theme.. thank you.


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.Blessings ♥~ॐ~__/\__ ~ॐ~♥

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The Lord’s Prayer – Mantra And Meanings

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The High Altar, Canterbury Cathedral

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THE MYSTERY OF THE KINGDOM OF HEAVEN

I remember reciting the Lord’s Prayer at school. I was proud to know
the words and often made a point of ‘leading the others’. It seemed
more of a mental exercise, than a heart felt-prayer. Certainly, the
sincerity of the words was lost in the verbal per formance of morning
school assembly.

The Lord’s Prayer is beautiful. There is no doubt that the simple
words portray trust in a compassionate God. However, the prayer seems
to carry a deeper message. The meaning of which is lost in difficult
locution. Why? The Lord’s Prayer, is an important example of Jesus’
teachings. In those few words, He seems to sum up the mystery of our
existence. Surely, it is worthy of more thoughtful examination. Yet,
few Theologians have tried to decipher Jesus’s words and give a
meaningful expla nation to the prayer.

However, there is one shining light who gave much time and thought to
the Lord’s Prayer. He was the journalist and writer Paul Brunton.
Ph.D. His book ‘The Inner Reality’ offers insights into the teachings
of Jesus as understood by the philosopher. Paul Brunton, studied with
masters in the East as well as with masters of Occidental knowledge.
He had the best tutors and first hand experience. What could be
better?

Many of his books are still available but unfortunately not, ‘The
Inner Reality.’

I cannot quote verbatim, Paul’s interpretation of the Lord’s prayer.
My own less inspiring interpretation will have to do.

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Old wooden carved Rood
St Fiacra – Brittany,Fr.

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THE LORD’S PRAYER

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After this manner therefore pray ye:

OUR FATHER, WHICH ARE IN HEAVEN, HALLOWED BY THEY NAME

Jesus taught, as a guide, the words of ‘The Lord’s Prayer’.

He did not mean for the prayer to become a vain repetition of words
uttered respectfully to please God. No, Jesus taught us to pray with
our hearts; that nothing must be set or fixed and formal. Prayer was
to be an outpouring of devotion to our Crea tor.

In prayer, we should utterly forget ourselves. In this self
forgetfulness is the secret of success in all prayer. For we are in
God. There is no time, no place, no state where God is not!

HALLOWED BE THY NAME

God is silent. There is no name we can give to Him. The name of God
is not one we can utter verbally. It is felt rather than addressed.
‘Hallowed be thy name means, ‘Too sacred for utter ance is thy
name’. When our thoughts and feelings have been silenced, if only for
a few seconds, we are hallowing the name of God.

THY KINGDOM COME; THY WILL BE DONE IN EARTH, AS IT IS IN HEAVEN

The Kingdom of God has already come. Although it was generally
understood that Jesus was referring to a world of perfect peace, this
is not what He meant. Jesus was only interested in spiritu al things.
The world to him, was an illusory one. The Kingdom to come is not of
this earth. It is the Kingdom of Heaven, a purely intangible and
invisible kingdom which everyone must find for himself. It is in one
place alone – in the heart.

THY WILL BE DONE ON EARTH AS IT IS IN HEAVEN

The ego must surrender to the self. The earth is the body and Heaven
is the peace we find by being at peace with ourselves and others.

GIVE US THIS DAY OUR DAILY BREAD

Jesus was not referring to the bread we eat. Most of us have plenty of
that! He was referring to ‘spiritual food,’ for the soul. What will
keep the soul alive? The daily awakening to reality and to truth.
While we remain deluded by external events and material wealth, we are
spiritually starving. To feed our selves properly, we must reflect
deeply and meditate deeply, if only for a few minutes each day.

AND FORGIVE US OUR DEBTS AS WE FORGIVE OUR DEBTORS

Jesus used simple words to explain this illustration of the law of
destiny. The law of karma helps us to understand why we are here and
our duties towards ourselves and others. Karma is dissolved in
non-action. Karma is also dissolved through right action.

AND LEAD US NOT INTO TEMPTATION, BUT DELIVER US FROM EVIL.

FOR THINE IS THE KINGDOM AND THE POWER AND THE GLORY FOREVER.

AMEN

We will always be tempted by something or other. We cannot remove
ourselves from temptation unless we join a monastery or convent and
even then, that only removes our body from the world, not our minds.
Jesus wanted us to face our problems with courage and faith. By
overcoming our problems we would grow in power and understanding. To
deliver us from evil, is to take away our ignorance, thereby,
dissolving our guilt. God, once found, is rarely lost again.


The Meaning Of AUM – Mantras and their Meanings


The letters A,U, and M created the friction that led to the beginning: the creation, preservation, and the dissolution. These three are known mythologically as the Conch of Visnu, The Damaru of Shiva, and the Tongue of Brahma. The primary manifestation of all activity is the cosmos comes from the principle of the three sounds.


The meaning of OM


 

What is the meaning of OM in the context of the Upanishads? The Upanishads teach that there is an eternal consciousness which remains ever the same is characterised by the functioning of the external senses, which receive and respond to the stream of impressions. The waking state appears to be the dominant state for the working of human life.

But each day, this waking state comes to a complete end when we withdraw into ourselves, close the doors and windows of the senses, and let our minds drift into an altogether different realm: the realm of sleep with dreams. Here again there is experience which seems similar to that of the waking state, but our environments in dream, the feel of our bodies, the people we mix with, are often very different to the scenario of our waking life. In dream, we can mingle happily with long lost relatives, somehow the pains of the body in the waking state have disappeared, and laws of time, space and causation, seem curiously flexible. The main thing about the dreaming state is that the outer senses are not operative; the whole spectacle takes place internally.

Then there is a third state, the state of dreamless sleep. This is a condition where dreams come to an end and there is total absence of mental activity. How do we know? We know in retrospect, when we wake up and feel: ‘Ah I must have slept so well, I remember nothing at all.’

The Upanishads say that dreamless sleep is a state of bliss, but such bliss is of a negative nature. It is the bliss of complete absence of the pairs of opposites, limitations and finitude. It is a kind of release and close to liberation, except that it is not a conscious experience. No one becomes liberated by going to sleep each night. This state too is brought to an end by our return to the waking state.

These three states make up the totality of empirical experience. It is clear that these states are passing and cancel each other out. Therefore, in the Vedanta analysis, they do not deserve to be called absolutely real. The vast importance of the waking state comes to a humble and humiliating end when we drift into dream. The fantastic imaginings of dream are more patently unreal, and they are completely dissolved when we wake up, or when we sink into dreamless sleep. And dreamless sleep, however sweet a condition, is rudely broken when we awaken from it and have to take on all the duties and burdens of waking life once again.

But all the time, alongside these three states, and illumining them from within, is the eternal consciousness, our true Self. It is sometimes called the fourth, or turiya; though far from being one more state like the others, turiya is the witness and support of all the three states. When understood, turiya is realised to be the whole of experience, the Absolute. Without this turiya, this eternal consciousness, the whole phenomenal cycle of waking, dream and dreamless sleep would have nothing to rest on. This eternal consciousness is not broken or interrupted by anything. It is this consciousness, which, reflected in the mind, gives us the senses of continuous identity, of being the same self, in spite of apparently losing ourselves completely in sleep and dream.

This is the Self to be realised, to be uncovered, in order to be liberated from the realm of the perishable. It is here that the symbology of OM shows us a path to freedom. OM points to the whole of the phenomenal realm, in its three phases, and also to the transcendent, which is the light behind experience. This way of analysing our experience can be shown by the visual symbol of OM, with the curves – lower,

middle and upper – representing, respectively, the states of waking, dreaming and dreamless sleep. Above these curves there is another which is set apart from the main form, to denote transcendence with the point signifying infinity.

Throughout experience, whether external, internal or quiescent as in deep sleep, the divine is always present equally as the turiya, just a the higher curve and the point always accompany and dominate the lower three. Therefore OM is a visual symbol representing the whole of experience both relative and absolute, finite and infinite.

The Mandukya Upanishad also shows how the word OM is a great symbol. The three states are represented by parts of the sound OM itself. Here the sound OM is depicted as having three phases. They are  usually represented in English by the letters A, U and M. The sound A (pronounced as in path) is the characteristic sound of the waking state. It is the sound of life and response to outer stimuli. A is the first sound produced when opening the mouth. The middle sound, U (pronounced as the oo in soon), is attributed to the dreaming state, and to states of internal mental activity, where we are withdrawn from outer objects. Mmm represents the Divine, and is associated with Lord Ganesha.

source: from the writings of Swami Rama

A Vedic Scholar Is Inspired: (Sai Gayatri) – Mantra And The Meaning

Deva Premal singing the Gayathri Mantra

 

The occasion was Christmas Eve, 1977. The place was the Sathya Sai Mandir in Brindavan, Whitefield, near Bangalore. The assembled audience consisted of a group of students and faculty members of Sri Sathya Sai College as well as a number of visiting devotees. It was in the presence of Sai Baba himself, that the Vedic scholar Pandit Sri Ghandikota Subrahmanya Shastry, was inspired to announce Sri Sathya Sai Gayatri, the mystic formula devoted to Sri Sathya Sai.


Which reads as follows:


The meaning of this is:


“I know through Gurus and Shastras (and by direct experience), that Sai is Bhagavan and ‘Iswara’ (Chosen deity). I meditate on this form in my heart with all my mental faculties. He is the embodiment of truth, divinity, universal consciousness and one who pervades all the words. I pray to such a Saiparameswar to direct our intellects to engage in auspicious and righteous activities. I meditate on this great form.”


This Sathya Sai Gayatri Mantra, like other Gayathris, is on a par with Veda Mantra or mystic formula. It has twenty four letters; it consists of three lines, each with eight letters. Such a composition has unique properties. According to Maharishi Vararuchi, the numerology of all letters adds up to one hundred and eight. This is why recitation is to be done 108 times; to realise the full effect of Siddhi, which is signified by the 108th number, i.e. Meru or the tassel of a rosary of japamala. Ashtottara Sata Nama, the 108 name chanting leads to the realisation of God, which is the goal.


Every Gayatri Mantra has a revealing prophet or Rishi and a presiding deity Adhishthana Devata, who is the subject of the mantra. This mantra is expressed through the inner workings of Sathya Sai through the mouth of Pandit Sri Ghandikota Subramanya Shastry in the presence of Sri Sai Baba. Needless to say that Sai Baba himself is the presiding deity of this mystic formula or mantra.
Shri S. Sastry expressed the essence of the Sathya Sai Gayatri in a verse of metrical form, Anushtup Chandas:
This verse means:


“Let the effulgent energy of Sathya Sai which exists always in my heart as pure consciousness enveloped by the body, direct or influence our mind-intellects to take the path of Dharma – virtue; santhi – peace; Sathya – truth and prema – love.”


“The real purpose of performing Karma is only to get rid of Ahamkara or ‘mine-ness’?; Karma or work, offered for the love of God comes back as grace. This is the strategy of escaping the bondage of Samsara. One must persuade the heart to meditate; persuade your heart and you can persuade the people. If you do wrong, your heart feels it. The heart is your witness. Move from the gross to the subtle, from the sense, the mind and the intellect, are getting closer to the Atman.


The effulgence of Atman transcends the senses, whose nature is fickleness. The senses do not have the capacity of power of decisiveness. Karma and upasana (spiritual instruction) are the two wings which enable us to fly upward to God. Karma is for disciplining body, mind and intellect; Karma is not slavery to senses or fate; life is a long journey which is helped by Yantra, Tantra, and Mantra; these make the journey easier. We must reduce our luggage. Being detached in samsara (our desires – destiny) is like mascara in the eye, like ghee on the tongue, one need not leave the worldly activity. The journey should be continued till the end. Don’t get off the train in wayside stations. One should reach the real destination with enthusiasm and animation, with a pure heart. Your pole-star or light is the name of God; that supreme light is the light of life, ‘jivanjyothi.)


The performance of duty by the God-given body is essential. Man’s accumulated blemish or sin is washed away by such action. Karmakanda, the field of action is like the flower from which follows the Upasana Kenda, the field of spiritual practice, which is like the raw fruit. This subsequently ripens into a sweet fruit of jnana, (wisdom).


The one supreme is described in different ways by the wise. Ekam Sat: Viprah Bahudha Vadanti. The puranas and the Vedas (holy Hindu scripture), contain the knowledge about Nature, (Prakruta Jnanam.) They teach the path of subtle action. They teach that immortality is the fruit of sacrifice; the path of enjoyment or  bhoga, leads only to illness and suffering- Roga. It is often said one cannot cross the path of Karma on a dusty road. It is only when you stop the moving vehicle that one is overtaken by the trailing dust. So long as you keep moving or performing Karma in a detached way, you are not overtaken by its bondage. Narada, who is omniscient, did not leave the field of action of Karmakanda.


There are really two aspects of conduct, good conduct and bad conduct; with egoism it becomes bad conduct. Ahamkara, ‘mine-ness’ or selfishness is the crown of all bad qualities. Wearing such a crown, even such notable personalities as Kamsa Sisupala, Danta Vaktra, Vishwamirtra and Sathyabhama came to grief.


All the lights of life are lit up on Divali Day; so light up the darkness of the past, which enveloped the Light of The Real Self in the past. The technique is to remove the threads of attachment one by one; at the end, the ‘cloth’ disappears and the mind is clear and pure.


Man is a bundle of desires. It is necessary to live in seclusion in order to avoid the wrong paths, thereby, avoiding the five wrongs or blemishes of sight, speech, mind, action and intellect. Moksha or liberation is nothing but Mohakshaya, the depletion of infatuation of the mind. One should engage in spiritual practices to remove all blemishes. Strength and support are gained thereby for the performance of one’s own duties and actions. Imitations or comparison with others are harmful and weakening.


Pursue the 5 F’s in life:
Follow the heart, the conscience, the atma in the heart.
Follow an adapt in spirituality.
Face the devil or evil without fear or favour.
Flight to the end.
Finish the game of life with success and liberation.
Daily life is Tapas. Tapas is devotion to the living Gods-Father and Mother. Sadhana is the cultivation of special attention to one’s true self. Sankaracharya expresses it in a paradoxical manner: “I have committed three sins, Oh God! By my pilgrimage to Benares, I have offended the principle of God’s all pervasiveness. Two, by meditation on You, it seems as though I have confined you who transcends the mind. Three, by praising you, I have committed the sin of limiting you who transcends speech.”


YO DEVASSATHYA SAYI NAH BUDDHIM DHARMADIGOCHAR AM


This verse means:


“Let the effulgent energy of Sathya Sai which exists always in my heart as pure consciousness enveloped by the body, direct or influence our mind-intellects to take the path of Dharma – virtue; santhi – peace; Sathya – truth and prema – love.”

In The Light Of Love – Mantras and Meanings

Om Sri Dhanvantre Namaha

OM SHREE DON-VON-TREY NAHM-AH-HA

“Salutations to the being and power of the celestial physician.”


In the Light of Love we are Home


Mother Earth – Home


Suddenly from behind the rim of the moon, in long, slow, motion moments of immense majesty, there emerges a sparkling blue and white jewel, a light delicate sky-blue sphere laced with slowly swirling veils of white, rising gradually like a small pearl in a thick sea of black mystery. It takes more than a moment to fully realise that this is Earth

astronaut Edgar Mitchell


It is related for example, of the sage Huen Sha that he was one day prepared to deliver a sermon to an assembled congregation, and was on the point of beginning, when a bird was heard to sing very sweetly close by; Huen Sha descended from his pulpit with the remark that the sermon had been preached. Another sage, Teu Tse, one day pointed to a stone lying near the temple gate, and remarked, “Therein lie all the buddhas of the past, the present, and the future.”

-A.K.Coomaraswamy


 

The search may begin with a restless feeling, as if one were being watched. One turns in all directions and sees nothing, yet one senses that there is a source for this deep restlessness; and the path that leads there is not a path to a strange place, but the path home. (“But you are home,” cries the Witch of the North. “All you need do is wake up!”)

-Peter Matthiessen

 


 

I never wanted too much out of life really. What I knew for certain, even as a small child, was that when I grew up I would have a garden. Somewhere to call home where I could grow flowers in. This dream of mine was a long time in the making. It was like reaching for a star, I could not quite grasp it. It was the same with a garden. Just when I’d given up all hope of owning a garden , then all of a sudden, I was given one. I’d waited so long that the preciousness of owning one, its value to me, is beyond measure.

 

SathyaSaiMemories


Inspirational – Mantra And Meanings

Deva Premal singing Om Mani Padme Hum

The mantra of Tantrik buddhism is ‘Om Mani Padme Hum’. Om is the sound of central enlightenment; ‘mani padme’ means ‘jewel in the lotus’ or ‘male with the female organ’, the state of completeness, energy infusing wisdom. ‘Hum’ is the sound of power, forcing the mantra into realization. This energy is often symbolised by an implement called the vajra, double-ended with ornate curbed prongs enclosing a central straight prong. All Tantrik Buddhists own one, which serves each person as a reservoir of personal power.

Vajrapani means ‘he who holds the vajra’. And to help forward his meditation, the Tantrik monk may also use a bell, whose rim he gently and continuously rubs with a stick so as to produce a sustained, gentle and entrancing hum. The sound is the symbol for the remotest expression of the subtlest Indian mantra ‘Om’ itself. For Tantra, like all good science, recognises that the fabric of even the densest-seeming objects is of an order related to vibration, which is symbolised for the human intelligence by sound.

*•.♥ Love ♥.•**·.

 

 

 

 

There is Only One Religion -The Religion of Love. -Sai Baba

 


 

Dharma doesn’t necessarily mean following a mundane and boring life.

It means a life of high adventure, not a life of endless, boring repetition.


Souls have different journeys.

The best thing to know is, not what everybody else does,

but what you do. Self-discovery essentially is finding your own dharma, your own rhythm.


We are not human beings having a spiritual experience. We are spritual beings having

a human experience.”

Teihard de Chadin

♥.♥.♥.♥.♥.♥.♥.♥.♥.♥.♥.♥.♥.

♥.♥.♥.♥.♥.♥.
♥.♥.♥.♥.░░░♥.♥.♥.♥.░░░..♥.♥.♥.♥.
♥.♥.♥.░░░░░♥.♥░░░░░.♥.♥.♥.♥♥.♥.♥░░░░░░░░░░░░♥.♥.♥.♥

The Meaning Of Metta – youtube Imee Ooi Metta in Pali

Metta – loving kindness Imee Ooi

I am hoping to add another page to my blog about the Buddhist teaching of Metta. (Loving Kindness) It is a teaching most of us can benefit from.   According to the cosmology of Buddhism there are numberless world- systems inhabited by infinitely varied categories of beings in different stages of evolution. Our earth is only a speck in our world-system, which again is a minute dot in the universe with its innumerable world-systems. Towards all beings everywhere one should radiate thoughts of boundless love. This is developed in the next method of practice, the universalization of metta.

The universalization of metta is effected in these three specific modes:

l. generalized radiation (anodhiso-pharana),
2. specified radiation (odhiso-pharana),
3. directional radiation (disa-pharana).

According to the Patisambhidamagga, the generalized radiation of metta is practiced in five ways, the specified radiation in seven ways, and the directional radiation in ten ways. These ten directional ways may be combined with the five categories of general radiation and with the seven categories of specified radiation, as we will show. In each of these modes of practice, any of the four phrases of the standard metta formula — “May they be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily” — may be used as the thought of radiation. Thus four types of thought applied to five, seven, and 120 objects of metta amount to 528 modes of radiation. Any of these can be used as a vehicle for attaining absorption (jhana) through the technique of metta-bhavana.


Generalized Radiation

The five ways of generalized radiation are as follows:

l. “May all beings (sabbe satta) be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.” 2. “May all those that breathe (sabbe pana) be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

3. “May all creatures (sabbe bhuta) be free from hostility, free from affliction. free from distress; may they live happily.”

4. “May all those with individual existence (sabbe puggala) be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

5. “May all those who are embodied (sabbe attabhavapariyapanna) be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

Specified Radiation

The seven ways of specified radiation are as follows:

1. “May all females (sabba itthiyo) be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.” 2. “May all males (sabbe purisa) be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

3. “May all the Noble Ones (sabbe ariya) be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

4. “May all worldlings (sabbe anariya) be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

5. “May all gods (sabbe deva) be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

6. “May all human beings (sabbe manussa) be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

7. “May all those in states of woe (sabbe vinipatika) be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

Directional Radiation

The ten ways of directional radiation involve sending thoughts of metta to all beings in the ten directions. This method, in its basic form, is applied to the class of beings (satta), the first of the five generalized objects of metta. But it can be developed further by extending metta through each of the five ways of generalized radiation and the seven ways of specified radiation, as we will see.

I.
1. “May all beings in the eastern direction be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

2. “May all beings in the western direction be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

3. “May all beings in the northern direction be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

4. “May all beings in the southern direction be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

5. “May all beings in the northeastern direction be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

6. “May all beings in the southwestern direction be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

7. “May all beings in the northwestern direction be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

8. “May all beings in the southeastern direction be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

9. “May all beings below (in the downward direction) be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

10. “May all beings above (in the upward direction) be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

II.
“May all those that breathe life in the eastern direction… above be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

III.
“May all creatures in the eastern direction… above be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

IV.
1-10. “May all those with individual existence in the eastern direction… above be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

V.
“May all those who are embodied in the eastern direction… above be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

VI.
“May all females in the eastern direction… above be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

VII.
“May all males in the eastern direction… above be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

VIII.
“May all Noble Ones in the eastern direction… above be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

IX.
“May all worldlings in the eastern direction… above be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

X.
“May all gods in the eastern direction… above be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

XI.
“May all human beings in the eastern direction… above be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

XII.
“May all those in states of woe in the eastern direction… above be free from hostility, free from affliction, free from distress; may they live happily.”

Explanation

In this technique of universalizing metta, each of the five categories of generalized radiation refers to the total dimension of animate, sentient, or organic existence, belonging to the three mundane spheres, namely, the kamaloka, the sphere of sensory existence where desire is the primal motivation; the rupaloka, the realm of the radiant Brahma gods with subtle form; and the arupaloka, the realm of the formless beings with pure mental life. Whether it is a “being,” or that which “breathes,” or a “creature,” or that which has “individual existence,” or that which “is embodied” — all refer to the totality of animate existence, the distinction being that each term expresses comprehensively a certain aspect of life in its entirety.

While visualizing each category one should keep in mind the specific aspect expressed by its designation. If one trains the mind in the manner of a “mental drill” after having exercised it with the first two methods, the meaning of the five unspecified or generalized terms will become clear. By the time one has completed the two methods, the consciousness will be sufficiently developed and all-embracing. And with such a consciousness, when each of these universal concepts is grasped, the universalization becomes effortless. It may be pointed out that visualization of each of these is no longer of individual objects, but of a concept which is total and all-embracing. The radiation in this case becomes a “flowing out” of love in abundant measure towards the conceptualized mental object — all beings, all creatures, etc.

Each of the seven categories of specified radiation comprehends a part of the total range of life, and in combination with the others expresses the whole. Itthi refers to the female principle in general, incorporating all females among the devas, human beings, animals, demons, spirits and denizens of hell. Purisa means the male principle evident in all the spheres of existence, and both itthi and purisa together comprehend the entirety. Again, from another angle, the ariyas or the spiritually transformed seers, and the anariyas or worldlings bound to the wheel of becoming, comprehend the totality. Ariyas are those who have entered the transcendental path; they are to be found in the human world and the celestial worlds and therefore they constitute the tip of the pyramid of sentient existence. Worldlings are in all the spheres of existence and constitute the body of the pyramid from the base to the tip, so to say. Likewise, the three categories of deva, manussa and vinipatika — gods, human beings, and those fallen into states of woe — comprehend the totality in terms of cosmological status. Devas, the radiant celestial beings, comprise the upper layer, human beings the middle layer, and vinipatikas the lower layer of the cosmological mound.

The “mental drill” in terms of directional radiation, the radiation of metta to the above twelve categories of beings in the ten directions, makes the universalization of metta a most exhilarating experience. As one mentally places oneself in a particular direction and then lets love flow out and envelop the entire region, one literally transports the mind to the sublimest heights leading to samadhi, concentrated absorption of the mind.

When one projects this total wish for others to dwell happily, free from hostility, affliction and distress, not only does one elevate oneself to a level where true happiness prevails, but one sets in motion powerful vibrations conducing to happiness, cooling off enmity, relieving affliction and distress. It will be seen, therefore, that universal love simultaneously infuses well-being and happiness and removes the mental and physical suffering caused by the mental pollutants of hostility, enmity and anger.

For detailed teachings about metta please visit:

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/buddharakkhita/wheel365.html#ch2