We Didn’t Own An Ipad! Funny Video

 

 

 

Children growing up during the 1970s remember!

 

“I remember when we first got an automatic washing machine. We all sat on the floor and watched it go round for one full load. It was better than watching t.v.  We had only three channels and no way of recording programmes. You watched live or not at all. The audience for the most popular programmes was enormous, in a way that’s inconceivable now except for things like the Olympics and state funerals/weddings.Taping things off the radio when they played the charts on a Sunday night, trying not to get the D.J. talking over the intro.I was trying to explain to my son that there were no mobile phones, no internet, no iPods or iPads, no computers when I was a child. TV only had 3 channels and closed down half the day and all night, and we didn’t have videos in any homes that I knew of, either. He couldn’t begin to get his head around it. With such limited entertainment available, people developed a real fondness for what was on offer. We had lots of good adverts on TV – The Milk Tray man and the man sneaking down in the middle of the night to get R. White’s lemonade out of the fridge.

 

Those weird foreign children’s serials the BBC put on (although that may have been more in the 60s) – Belle and Sebastian,White Horses and the daddy of them all – The Singing Ringing Tree. I think they dubbed them, as you couldn’t really expect tiny children to read subtitles. But somehow you could still hear the original dialogue underneath – is that right?!”

Calling Swap Shop on 01 811 8055. Or, in reality, watching  “Swap Shop” and being really envious of those children that were actually allowed to use the phone.

….

 And where were your Parents?
Parenting methods were more laissez-faire. My mum and dad used to drive to the pub and leave me in the car with a bottle of pop and a packet of crisps whilst they sat inside.I always travelled alone on flights, mum and dad went straight down the back to smoke and drink in the rear seats. I saw them at take off and landing.

 

 

“And no-one had a clue when it came to health and safety. Sitting on my mum’s lap in the front seat of the car. No seat belts. Ever. Standing up in the car with head out the sunroof. Or sitting in the back of the car close to the rear window.  Our local play park was a death trap. The slide was very, very, very high and there was no padded stuff or even grass – just rock hard concrete or tarmac. The climbing frame looked like it had been constructed using scaffolding poles. Also,  1970s style had a certain ‘je ne sais quoi‘ about it. Dad wore medallions and drove a Firebird Trans Am with an eagle on the bonnet. Mum said you could hear it coming five minutes before arrival. Flicked-out hair-dos done with curling-tongs and before any sort of gel or mousse had been invented. People describe the 70s as the decade that taste forgot. Au contraire. It was massively stuffed with taste. Just not, well…the best.”

 

a favourite from the 1970s
A time of simple Pleasures:
simple Christmases

It was a time of simple pleasures such as The Blue Peter Christmas lantern that was a tinsel-covered pair of wire hangers with actual candles. Jackie posters that came in 3 parts so you got David Cassidy’s legs one week, torso the next and his head the next! Queueing up to watch Star Wars (Matinee) aged 7 in Manchester with my brother and parents was a real treat!  British gastronomy attained truly dizzying heights.

I remember making my Mum breakfast for her birthday with an orange juice that came in a packet and you added water to it. I thought it the height of sophistication. I can remember the awful orange juice we had that used to stick to the bottle. I’m sure this was not good for us. Rice paper at 1p per sheet – it was a novelty to have paper you were allowed to eat.”Ice Magic” (went stiff when you put it on the ice cream).

 

every little girls dream bike

The Bad Things:

“Of course, that’s not to say it didn’t have its bad points Those terrifying public safety films they used to show you in schools. Phone boxes – always smelled of pee (you didn’t dare stand on the floor if there was water on it) and the receiver always smelled of ciggies. Buses regularly on strike and having to walk home six miles from school all alone in the rain.  I remember getting REALLY horribly burnt in the summer. Kids didn’t really wear sun cream back then. Even the tarmac bubbled up in the 1976 heatwave.”

We Never Owned An Ipad! – Cute Video


One of the cleverest  videos ever posted. A British comedy “take” on kids growing up in the 1970’s. This is definitely worth a few of your precious  minutes to just  sigh, giggle, reflect and smile on all that was so much part of our lives back then.  (You’ll be surprised how many well-loved items from that era have been almost completely forgotten. Was it a better time?  in hind-sight I think so ha! –  Your views on the video welcome. 🙂  –


 70

1970s Fad’s and Fun

Growing Up 1970’s Meant Streaking, Pet rocks, and Atari Video games, and much more.

There were a few fads in the 1970s. Streaking was probably one of the more memorable. So popular was removing all of your clothes in a public place and running to avoid capture, that songs were written in it’s honor. Truckers enjoyed the spotlight too. Songs about their lifestyle burst onto the scenes, CB radios became popular accessories in cars, and phrases like “Keep on Trucking” and “That’s a 10-4 Good Buddy” were heard routinely. Pet Rocks, lava lamps, and waterbeds were popular while strobe lights and black lights were often found in a teenager’s room. Interior decorating often still included colors such as avocado and gold. Even appliances. Shag rugs graced many floors. Furniture upholstered with crushed velvet and mirrored walls were also common in some circles. Kids had a Spirograph to draw colorful designs, Legos to build almost anything, and other favorites like an Etch-A-Sketch or a Lite Brite set. Weebles, Easy-Bake Ovens, Creeple People, Nerf Balls, Hot Wheels (which entered the scene in the 60’s), and Slime were among other popular choices. Twister, Aggravation, Battleship, and Yahtzee were around in addition to the more traditional board games like Monopoly and Life. Rubik’s Cubes and Air Hockey sets came along and in the march toward today’s video games, Pong and early Atari games were very well received. Big Wheels were for the little ones and Banana Seat Bikes were popular with kids who were a bit older. Kids who were really lucky however got a mini-bike or moped. In the 1970s iPods were unheard of and records and tapes were the medium of music. Everyone had a clock radio and a stereo record player. Quadrophonic sound was available and many kids enjoyed their cassette recorder to capture music off of the radio. In cars, 8-track players were around but lost out to cassette decks by the end of the decade. We also didn’t have the electronic keyboards, but as kids we learned to play a chord organ which luckily required no lessons whatsoever! In the 1970’s cable TV was absent from many homes and network TV stations; ABC, CBS, and NBC were king. Microwave ovens started taking over the market. Cordless phones were just coming out, but of course cell phones were well off in the future.

those kinky boots
those kinky boots

 

comments box is below.. there is a little grey circle at the top of the post with comments number.. This is where you need to click to leave a comment. Sorry about this.. Nothing to do with me! eve

Very Old ‘Sai’ Interview From The 1970’s. Sathya Sai memories Cont.

The youtubes are posted with the following introduction.

This is a video which recently came into my hands. So, I want to freely share it here with you. It’s an Interview Sai Baba gave to overseas (Australian) devotees on December 24th in 1978. The discussion taking place in the interview room, is about consciousness. The second talk given by Sai Baba below is also about consciousness and was presented in the Mandir at Prashanthi Nilayam sometime during the 1980’s.

A Young Sai Baba with early devotees

Sai Baba Speaks About Consciousness

During a talk given in the mandir at Prasanthi Nilayam, Sai Baba explained, “Divine consciousness is God. This consciousness is permeating everything. It is in an ant as well as in the Brahman, only in the Brahman it is self-aware, forever. There is nothing in the universe that is not God. The Divine is in everything. How can the unlimited  be limited to a certain form; that is the height of foolishness, I tell you. For the sake of human satisfaction you give name and form to the Lord, but in reality he does not have any form at all.

Matter plus energy is God. It is the energy of consciousness that has created the universe. Even in the smallest particle of matter such as electron, proton, and neutron is this  consciousness. Gold is gold even if it is shaped in all kinds of ornaments. In the same manner the Divine does not lose its Divinity because it forms itself in the material universe.

In the Upanishads it is affirmed that: ‘Brahman is the One beside whom there is nothing else existent…’ Brahman is the consciousness that knows itself in all that exists.”

That is what Sai Baba is telling us. He  is aware of himself in everything and in each and every one of us too. He assures us of this fact  in many different ways.

Sai Baba closed the talk by saying: “Who but a pathfinder, a Divine teacher can save man by leading him, like a beacon, to the path of real peace?”

Finally:

It is further stated in the Upanishads that “Brahman is one with our soul and our true soul is our self or atma without which we could not breathe or live.” Baba’s life among us thus has profound meaning.  He helps us find our own true soul or self, to become self-aware, because he is one with our soul, as we are one with each other. This self-awareness is a mighty difficult job, but it is all that our sojourn here  on Earth is about.The reason we come to Earth.  All  is awareness. One cannot, however, attain this awareness without the Divine’s guidance, and it is supremely worthwhile to seek.

from a devotee’s diary