LIGHT AND MYSTICISM – Inspirational Quotations From David Bohm

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Bohm was born in the 1920s in America. He showed immense early promise in maths and physics when a child and was fascinated by science and science fiction. He was part of the Manhattan Project, lead by Oppenheimer, which saw America drop the first nuclear bomb, believing at the time that it might be the means to bring an end to world conflicts. He since recognised that he was wrong. A lifelong Marxist who was interested in ideas which might bring us to coexist in a more humane and harmonious way, he fell foul of the MacCarthy trials of the 50s and was forced to leave the country, never to return (Oppenheimer himself is thought to have been instrumental in informing upon him). As his career as a scientist progressed, he became more and more fascinated by the findings of Quantum Science, seeing in it a radical challenge to the prevailing Mechanistic view of the Universe that had begun with Newton. For Bohm, that model for understanding the Cosmos and our place in it was gone. Relativity and Quantum Theory had demonstrated that the true nature of Reality was fundamentally different from that with which we had been operating with since Newton and Descartes. Not only did he see this as a major revolution in Science, but he hoped that it would lead to a similar revolution in human Consciousness and how we lived together. For Bohm, how we saw the Universe was simultaneous with how we saw each other.

DAVID BOHM: LIGHT AND MYSTICISM

“WEBER: Speaking of mysticism, there is an important idea that I would like to discuss and understand and that is the idea of light. That is especially important to me because you are a physicist. Light has been used as THE privileged metaphor in the language of mysticism and experimental religions, going back to the Greeks and the east. In all these, light is the symbol for our union with the divine. They talk about light without shadow, an all-suffusing light, and it comes up as the central metaphor in near-death experiences. Do you have any hypothesis as to why light has been singled out as the privileged metaphor?

BOHM: If you want to relate it to modern physics (light and more generally anything moving at the speed of light, which is called the null-velocity, meaning null distance), the connection might be as follows. As an object approaches the speed of light, according to relativity, its internal space and time change so that the clocks slow down relative to other speeds, and the distance is shortened. You would find that the two ends of the light ray would have no time between them and no distance, so they would represent immediate contact (this was pointed out by G N Lewis, a physical chemist, in the 1920s). You could say that from this point of view of present field theory, the fundamental fields are those of very high energy in which mass can be neglected, which would essentially be moving at the speed of light. Mass is a phenomenon of connecting light rays which go back and forth, sort of freezing them into a pattern. So matter, as it were, is condensed or frozen light. Light is not merely electromagnetic waves but in a sense other kinds of waves that go at that speed. Therefore all matter is a condensation of light into patterns moving back and forth at average speeds which are less than the speed of light. Even Einstein had some hint of that idea. You could say that when we come to light we are coming to the fundamental activity in which existence has its ground, or at least coming close to it.”

Earlier Weber asks Bohm:

“WEBER: What you have been saying sounds like mysticism – that we are grounded in something infinite. How does it differ from what the great mystics have said?

“Bohm replies:

“BOHM: I don’t know that there’s necessarily any difference.”

And yet elsewhere there is this exchange:

“WEBER: Is the super-implicate order a euphemism for God?

BOHM: I don’t know what the meaning of the question is since the super-implicate order is in turn part of a still greater implicate order. It’s not a euphemism for God because its limited.

WEBER: Then let’s shift the question to the ultimate super super-implicate order.

BOHM: But we can’t grasp that in thought. We’re not saying that any of this is another word for God. I would put it another way: people had insight in the past about a form of intelligence that had organised the universe and they personalised it and called it God. A similar insight can prevail again today without personalising it and without calling it a personal God.”

– from THE ESSENTIAL DAVID BOHM: CHAPTER 4: THE SUPER-IMPLICATE ORDER. ISBN: 0415261740 DAVID BOHM: LIGHT AND MYSTICISM

Old Widow In Her Weeds And Other Poems – Love And Friendship

from the wild garden - this month
from the wild garden – this month

 

Shy Marigold
Shy Marigold

Photographs from the summer garden. This year I grew my wild-flowers from seeds. They survived the driving rain and gusty winds of Springtime, the cold and dull days of early Summer now in August, they bloom and grow as if to reach the sky. So magical to behold. I have taken many photos of them all, especially the Marilgolds although I have only posted a few.  Eve

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“A poor old Widow in her weeds
Sowed her garden with wild-flower seeds;
Not too shallow, and not too deep,
And down came April — drip — drip — drip.
Up shone May, like gold, and soon
Green as an arbour grew leafy June.
And now all summer she sits and sews
Where willow herb, comfrey, bugloss blows,
Teasle and pansy, meadowsweet,
Campion, toadflax, and rough hawksbit;
Brown bee orchis, and Peals of Bells;
Clover, burnet, and thyme she smells;
Like Oberon’s meadows her garden is
Drowsy from dawn to dusk with bees.
Weeps she never, but sometimes sighs,
And peeps at her garden with bright brown eyes;
And all she has is all she needs –
A poor Old Widow in her weeds.”  – Walter de la Mare, Peacock Pie

 

Funny Faces
Funny Faces

 

 

Marigolds
Marigolds

 

LONELINESS  is the doorway to unspecified desire. In the bodily pain of aloneness
is the first step to understanding how far we are from a real
friendship, from a proper work or a long sought love. Loneliness can
be a prison, a place from which we look out at a world we cannot
inhabit; loneliness can be a bodily ache and a penance, but loneliness
fully inhabited also becomes the voice that asks and calls for that
great, unknown someone or something else we want to call our own.
Loneliness is the very state that births the courage to continue
calling, and when fully lived can undergo its own beautiful reversal,
becoming in its consummation, the far horizon that answers back.

From upcoming The Reader’s Circle essay; LONELINESS
(c) David Whyte

 

Patunia growing in a window box
Patunia growing in a window box

 

Wild Rose - from the vase in the kitchen
Wild Rose – from the vase in the kitchen

Sex, Rock and Roll And Those Other Messiahs – Book Review

 

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Buddhist monk in orange robes sitting in Angkor Wat, Cambodia
Buddhist monk in orange robes sitting in Angkor Wat, Cambodia – David Bowie

 

So you are attracted to Tibetan Buddhism and David Bowie, have read some really good books and learned a few meditation techniques, now you want to delve deeper and spend real time with Buddhist Masters? How do you guard against being fooled by a charismatic charlatan? What criteria do you apply to your search for an authentic teacher? Lama Jampa Thaye’s advice reflects a commonsense approach:

“Although one may come across examples of authentic Buddhist masters who dress or speak unconventionally, there is no licence in Buddhism for unethical behaviour. Thus oriental or occidental masters who claim their selfish and abusive behaviour is a display of ‘skillful means’ or ‘crazy wisdom’ are to be given a wide berth – unless we want to jump over a cliff hand-in-hand with them.”

Sound advice, I have nothing to add to this except these few words.

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I have been and still am a seeker. Older now and perhaps a bit battered by the experience but still a seeker. I have ceased to question stars, books and alchemy. I have begun to listen to the teaching my heart whispers to me in the dead of night, when all is still.  Eve

 

David Bowie:

 Mary Finnegan has a new book released about David Bowie called the Psychedelic Suburbia: David Bowie and the Beckenham Arts Lab.

 

You can read it in about two hours. It’s all about who was there, who was who and leaves one with the feeling of who cares.  Well, aficionados of David Bowie days will care and read it, particularly now that he is dead, and young people into bi-sexuality.  So will those curious about the  “sex, rock and roll” and  early drug scene in the sixties. A pretty large and  marketable crowd.

What is interesting is  that in Mary’s blog post  in 2013, in the archives at her website Flower Raj she writes about her motivation for writing,  which was to expose the”horror stories”  and the “dark side, the very dark side” of  Tibetan Buddhism that she sees has gone down a wrong path. This is because of corrupt Tibetan lamas, she says,  and the naiveté of old flower children, like Mary.

In this  post she also notes she became a “one-woman activist”  to expose her Lama Sogyal and his corruptions, as well as the shadow side of Tibetan Buddhism which she knew quite well. She  was a one woman activist and she did expose Sogyal the predator Tibetan  lama , relentlessly. For she knew a great deal about the dark side of Tibetan Buddhism,  having been in his inner circle. She was one of his older  female students who ‘pimped” for him to find young ,  naive women to join his Lama hareem.  Unknown to the public, pimping for their lamas is a common task of devoted Western Tibetan Buddhists inside their communities or sanghas.  Mary also writes explicitly about her  experience,  in her short memoir about Sogyal.

1)Rigpa:Behind The Thangkas” (link to the book on line.)

  1. This would have been the better book and more helpful to the younger generation who sadly now will  be fooled by this book about David Bowie. This of course is the one people will want to buy. It is a shame, all the same, because Mary was a feminist voice for the many women that had been abuse by this Tibetan lama and so many others like him. She was a feminist voice with experience of the sexual abuse inside these Tibetan Buddhists sanghas that  appears to have been silenced. I post this link for those who wish to read the entire details.

 

hhtp://www.extibetanbuddhist.com/2016/01/11/david-bowie-mary-finnegan-and-the-marketing-of-tibetan-lamas/

 

http://theflowerraj.org/ 

highly recommend this blog.

An Ocean of Consciousness – Video

This is an excellent short video on consciousness from David Lynch. I am sure most of you are familiar with David’s work in films. For those of you who have not heard of him, here’s a little about his career. David Keith Lynch is an American film director, television director, visual artist, musician, occasional actor, and author. Here he talks about how “lost” he had been at one time, but when he began meditating how his life changed. David, in this talk, gives us a  glimpse into his own achievements through meditation. (video viewing time about 10 minutes but worth every single second.. 🙂 )

This talk is not an advertisement for TM – although the TM Society is mentioned.


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Wisdom From The Buddha On Being Lost

The Buddha said, “So watch the thought and its ways with care, and let it spring from love born out of concern for all beings.” What The Buddha is saying here is do not make thought spring from love born out of concern for all beings. Rather, we are advised by the Buddha to let it spring from the love that is our own true nature. Now this is not always well understood,  so let me further explain.

When we cannot heal the rupture between ourselves and the rest of life itself, created by mistaken concepts, we remain forever lost, and uncertain about what our lives mean and where we belong. Confused by concepts of separate self and distant “other,” as though pursued by furious enemies, we run until we are totally lost, hiding in whatever places seem to offer us safety. Our safest haven, however, may be found neither in running nor in hiding, but in staying still. Here is a parable that explains clearly the meaning of this:

“There was a man so displeased by the sight of his own shadow and so displeased with his own footsteps that he determined to get rid of both. The method he hit upon was to run away from them. So he got up and ran. But every time he put his foot down there  was another step, while his shadow kept up with them without the slightest difficulty. He attributed his failure to the fact that he was not running fast enough. So he ran faster and faster, without stopping, until he finally dropped dead. He failed to realize that if he merely stepped into the shade, his shadow would vanish, and if he sat down and stayed still, there would be no more footsteps.”

From the Taoist philosopher Chuang Tzu

When we make the courageous choice to be still, rather than running away, we have the chance to establish a relationship with what is.

Now doesn’t this story ring a bell for you? I feel I have a ways to go before I reached the blissful state  “of no more footsteps.”

The Opening Of Eyes – Inspirational Poems

houseflowers

 

I was out in the garden this afternoon looking for flowers to photograph. I came across the first “Forget Me Not” flower of the season. I rarely take photos of these flowers, due to them being so small. I was really happy with this photo though, the leaves with the raindrops gave it a real feeling of prettiness. According to an ancient legend, a knight about to get married, dressed in his armor, was taking a ride along a river with his fiancée. His fiancée saw an extremely beautiful bunch of blue flowers rocking on the waves, and asked her paramour to pick them up. As he reached over to get them, the knight slipped and fell into the river.

The heavy armor hindered him from swimming and he started sinking into the water, but not before throwing her the blue flowers and shouting: “Don’t forget me!” This beautiful flower came to be known as Forget-me-not, associated in the language of flowers with true love – the love that never dies.

 

The Opening of Eyes

That day I saw beneath dark clouds
the passing light over the water
and I heard the voice of the world speak out,
I knew then, as I had before
life is no passing memory of what has been
nor the remaining pages in a great book
waiting to be read.
It is the opening of eyes long closed.
It is the vision of far off things
seen for the silence they hold.
It is the heart after years
of secret conversing
speaking out loud in the clear air.

It is Moses in the desert
fallen to his knees before the lit bush.
It is the man throwing away his shoes
as if to enter heaven
and finding himself astonished,
opened at last,
fallen in love with solid ground.

— David Whyte
from Songs for Coming Home
©1984 Many Rivers Press

HeartBreak – Inspirational Quotes and Poems

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Photo from Paris, Zig Zag – I think this photo was taken outside Notre Dame, Cathedral.


I saw grief drinking a cup of sorrow and called out, “It tastes sweet, does it not?” “You’ve caught me,” grief answered, “and you’ve ruined my business, how can I sell sorrow when you know it’s a blessing?” ~ Rumi

“When there’s no getting over that rainbow, when the smallest of dreams won’t come true….” – Yes, I’ve been there, haven’t you? The need to reach out and touch another, and yet that ‘other’ is not able to deal with us or our pain. Perhaps their own pain is all too much. Who knows. We often befriend the most unlikely people and for all the wrong reasons. What were we thinking of?  The truth is, we often don’t think at all on these matters. Now it’s time to let go and move on. For when we don’t let go, a relationship can  become bad, or even toxic to the point of despair.  The Great Wisdom Masters tell us, “Our good friends are our gifts in life. Others are our painful lessons.” I concur with this.  But even painful lessons pass, although perhaps etched on our hearts forever more.   David Whyte has written this beautiful piece, on Heartbreak, that I want to share.


Heartbreak is unpreventable; the natural outcome of caring for people and things over which we have no control, of holding in our affections those who inevitably move beyond our line of sight. Heartbreak begins the moment we are asked to let go but cannot. In other words, it colors and inhabits and magnifies each and every day. Heartbreak is not a visitation, but a path that human beings follow through even the most average lifetime. Heartbreak is our indication of sincerity: in a love relationship, in work, in trying to learn a musical instrument, in the attempt to shape a better, more generous self. Heartbreak is the beautifully helpless side of love and affection and is just as much an essence and emblem of care as the spiritual athlete’s quick but abstract ability to let go. Heartbreak has its own way of inhabiting time and its own beautiful and trying patience in coming and going. Heartbreak is inescapable, yet we use the word ‘heartbreak’ as if it only occurs when things have gone wrong: an unrequited love, a shattered dream, a child lost before their time. Heartbreak, we hope, is something we hope we can avoid; something to guard against, a chasm to be carefully looked for and then walked around; the hope is to find a way to place our feet where the elemental forces of life will keep us in the manner to which we want to be accustomed and which will keep us from the losses that all other human beings have experienced without exception since the beginning of conscious time. But heartbreak may be the very essence of being human, of being on the journey from here to there, and of coming to care deeply for what we find along the way…

From the upcoming Third Readers’ Circle Essay,
‘HEARTBREAK’

….


Might add just back from ten days in wildest Kent, UK, where hurricane winds and flooding were pretty much a daily event.. Odd sort of Christmas present, I suppose.  (Perhaps I should say it was an adventure on the wild side of life and one we shan’t forget! )

When Waking – Inspirational Quotations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WHAT TO REMEMBER WHEN WAKING

Namaste♥ ॐ♥Pranam♥ ॐ♥Namaskar”

In that first, hardly noticed moment to which you wake, coming back to
this life from the other more secret, moveable and frighteningly
honest world where everything began, there is a small opening into the
new day which closes the moment you begin your plans.

What you can plan is too small for you to live. What you can live
wholeheartedly will make plans enough for the vitality hidden in your
sleep.

To be human is to become visible while carrying what is hidden as a
gift to others.

To remember the other world in this world is to live in your true inheritence.

You are not a troubled guest on this earth, you are not an accident
amidst other accidents. You were invited from another and greater
night than the one from which you have just emerged.

Now, looking through the slanting light of the morning window toward
the mountain presence of everything that can be, what urgency calls
you to your one love? What shape waits in the seed of you to grow and
spread its branches against a future sky?

Is it waiting in the fertile sea? In the trees beyond the house? In
the spring rush of migrating birds? In the open and lovely white page
on the waiting desk?

~ David Whyte

Namaste♥ ॐ♥Pranam♥ ॐ♥Namaskar”

The Self alone is existent. Everything else is really non-existent and is but an illusory superimposition on the Self. Hence the wise become unattached to the objects of the world, and neither hanker after those objects which give pleasure nor shun those which give pain. ~  Baba