Lilith Snippets – Myth And Legend

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I can’t resist the myth of Lilith, although I don’t believe one word. Lilith has been unkindly treated by history. And of course she is just so easy to find fault with. She actually would not obey her husband and declared herself equal to him in every way! And like all strong headed women she left him! She spoke the Ineffable Name of the Creator and soared up into the air. Thereupon Adam stood in prayer before the Creator and thus he spake: ” O Lord of the Universe, the woman Thou hast given me has fled from me.”

The Lilith teaching is actually used to divide the relationship between man and woman and destroy the start of marriage which God intended for all creation. The Lord did not create two separate beings in the book of Genesis but one. Adam existed as a dual being until  God caused him to sleep and divided Him into another separate creation, creating Eve in Genesis 2. Man is neither complete by himself nor is woman, but the two come together to create the original creation. The story of Lilith is intriguing, but also dark. Lilith, the first wife of Adam, spoke the truth when she said, “I am equal to Adam in every way.”  She suffers a dreadful fate from a  wrathful God and vengeful men. She will be forever known as the demon-ess, the dark one. The seducer of men and young boys.


Aramaic Demon incantation bowl depicting female figure bound by rod and chain – dated between the 5th and 8th century AD. Translation of text: “Elisur Bagdana, the king of demons and the great ruler of Lilliths, I beswear you, the Lilith Hablas, granddaughter of the Lilith Zarnay, who resides upon the threshhold of the house and kills boys and girls, in order that you should struck in your pericardium – the mighty Siqaros – go out from her son of Ahata from the threshhold of Yaya daughter of Aya. Behold, I write to you and behold, I dismiss you, just as demons write deeds of divorce to their wives and they do not come back. Flee and go out and do not appear, from this day and forever. And may you go out from her, from her house, from her dwelling place, from her entrance, from her exit, from the four corners of her house, from this day and forever. Amen, Amen, Selah, This bow is for the curse of the brother and of the sisters, and from the curse of the neighbours, and from the curse of the male nurse, and from the stranger and the relative, from the curse of the Aramaean and of the Jew, and from the curse demon, from the blow demon, from the vow demons, and from idol spirits, and from the blow demons, and from the mevakkalta demon, and from the tormentor, and from man and from woman, neither during the daytime nor during the night, from this day and forever. Amen, Amen, Selah. Yah Yah Yah, yyh Elohim.”

the Story of Lilith can be found on this link..

https://sathyasaimemories.wordpress.com/2012/01/20/goddess-or-demon-lilith-myths-and-legends/

Goddess Or Demon? “Lilith” – Myths and Legends

 

 

 

The Lilith teaching is actually used to divide the relationship between man and woman and destroy the institute of marriage which God intended for all creation. The Lord did not create two separate beings in the book of Genesis but one. Adam existed as a dual being until  God caused him to sleep and divided Him into another separate creation, creating Eve in Genesis 2. Man is neither complete by himself nor is woman, but the two come together to create the original creation. The story of Lilith is intriguing, but also dark. Lilith, the first wife of Adam, spoke the truth when she said, “I am equal to Adam in every way.”  She suffers a dreadful fate from a  wrathful God and vengeful men. She will be forever known as the demoness, the dark one. The seducer of men and young boys.

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The Story Of Lilith

From Ancient Israel: Myths and Legends by Angelo S. Rappoport

Queen of the demons is Lilith, long-haired and winged. She is supposed to have been the first wife of Adam. She had been one of the wives of Sammael, but of a wild, heroic and passionate nature she left her spouse and joined Adam. From their union issued the demons or Shedim, who rode about in the world as wicked spirits, persecute and plague men, and bring upon them illness, disease, and other sufferings.

Lilith, like Adam, had been created from the dust (Adamah) of the earth. But as soon as she had joined Adam they began to quarrel, each refusing to be subservient and Submissive to the other. “I am your lord and master,” spoke Adam, “and it is your duty to obey me.” But Lilith replied: “We are both equal, for we are both issued from dust (Adamah), and I will not be submissive to you.” And thus they quarrelled and none would give in. And when Lilith saw this she spoke the Ineffable Name of the Creator and soared up into the air. Thereupon Adam stood in prayer before the Creator and thus he spake: ” O Lord of the Universe, the woman Thou hast given me has fled from me.”

And the Holy One, blessed be His name, sent at once three angels whose names were Senoi, Sansenoi, and Sammangelof, to fetch and bring Lilith back to Adam. He ordered them to tell her to return, and if  she refused to obey then a hundred of her offspring would die daily. The three afore-mentioned angels followed Lilith, and they found her in the midst of the sea, on the mighty waves (which were once to drown the Egyptians).

They communicated to her the command of the Eternal, but she refused to return. And the angels spake to this rebel, this she-demon: “We will drown thee in the sea.” But she made answer: “Know ye not that I have been created for the purpose of weakening and punishing little children, infants and babes. I have power over them from the day they are born until they are eight days old if they are boys, and until the twentieth day if they are girls.” And when the three angels heard her speech they wished to drown her by force, but she begged them to let her live, and they gave in. She swore to them in the name of the living God that whenever she came and saw the names or images or faces of these three angels, Senoi, Sansenoi, and Sammangelof, upon an amulet or cameo in the room where there was an infant, she would not touch it. But because she did not return to Adam, every day a hundred of her own children or spirits and demons die.

The legend of Lilith and the message of the three angels is found in several sources of Rabbinical lore in some of which it is quoted from the Alphabetum Siracidis.

The book known as the Sefer Rasiel describes the formula to be written upon amulets or cameos and to be placed in the rooms where there are new-born babes. It refers to Lilith as the first Eve, and conjurers her in the name of the three angels and the angel of the sea to whom she had sworn not to harm the babes in whose rooms she found written on paper the names of the three angels.

Lilith is thus a female night demon, and is also known under the name of Meyalleleth or the howling one.

The she-demon Makhlath (the dancer) and her daughter Agrath4 are two female demons who live in strife with Lilith. Lilith is accompanied by four hundred and eighty hosts of evil spirits and destroying angels, and she is constantly howling. Makhlath is accompanied by four hundred and seventy-eight hosts of evil spirits. She and her daughter Agrath, from the Zend word Agra = beating, are in constant enmity with Lilith.

Constant war is waged between them, and they meet on the day of atonement. Whilst they are thus engaged in quarrel and strife, the prayers of Israel ascend to Heaven, whilst the accusers are absent, being otherwise engaged.

Agrath commands hosts of evil spirits and demons, and rides in a big chariot. Her power is pararnount on Wednesdays and Saturdays, for on these days Agrath, the daughter of Makhlath, roves about in the air accompanied by eighteen myriads of evil spirits.


1. Niddah, 16b; Erubin, 100b.

2. Alphabetum Siracidis (Sepher Ben Sira), edit. Steinschneider, 1858. See on Lilith. Gaster, in Monatsschrift fuer Gesch. u. Wissenschaft d. Judent., Vol. XXIX (1880), pp. 553-555.

3. Elia Levita, Tishbi s.v. Lilith.

4. Pesachim, 112b; Numbers Rabba, 12.

5. Yalkut Chadash, s.v. Keshaphim, No. 56.

6. Pesachim, 112b.

Source:  Lilith  from Ancient Israel: Myths and Legends by Angelo S. Rappoport