Om, A True Devotee – Sathya Sai Memories Cont.




Om’s Amazing Story of Love and Courage – Child Of Light


Banning is not only something that happens to those physically close to Sai, it happens to others who are seated in the general public areas too. There are so many untold stories of seekers who were banned, never to return. Most do not hold a grudge, they still love Swami, although they are not allowed to be anywhere near him. I’d say they were Swami’s closest devotees…

This is the story of Om – an American who has lived in Puttparthi  for the last 30 or so years.


Om, the daughter of professor parents who taught in Ivy league colleges in the USA, speaks with a cultured American accent. She obviously had, at one time, enjoyed a very intellectual lifestyle and is herself a literati. How and why she came to visit Swami I have no idea. Came she did, and stayed. Her story is one of the most interesting ones in Sai Baba circles. Yet hardly a word has been written about her.

Om enjoyed the casual ashram at Whitefield way back in the 1970’s where she had many close experiences with Sathya Sai. Yet  sometime later on she was made persona non-grata. She was banned from entering all of Swami’s ashrams.

I remember her telling me some years ago that Sai Baba had told her at dashan one day that, although she was a graduate, and clever, he was going to change all that. He did. Once Om was banned from the ashrams, she was devastated. Swami had obviously done an ego-ectomy on her, now what to do next? She did not know. She visited Sri Ramana’s Ashram in Tamil Nadu for a time to think things over. She was, at the time, quite ill due to the banning enforcement. She did not function well at all; she was thought a little odd among Ramana devotees.

After reflecting her position while at Ramana’s ashram, Om made the decision to stay in India and to become a Sannyasin. She threw away her passport, clothes and all other possessions. She took to wearing a simple orange robe. After sometime she returned to Puttaparthi and began a life of total austerity.

I first noticed her on my second visit to P.N. ashram way back in the early 1990’s. She would stand outside the old darshan area, looking over the wall, watching Swami give darshan. I remember, even now, how a beautiful smile would flashed across her face whenever she saw him. Her dismissal had not soured her in the least. She was full of love for Baba. Besides her beautiful smile,  her face shone brightly whenever in the vicinity of the ashram.

It is only in more recent years we began to speak to each other. She often stops me when I am shopping in Puttaparthi. Om likes to comment on my clothes. This year’s encounter with Om was pretty strange. On this certain day before the shopping trip, I’d been looking in the mirror at my Salwar Kameez  for sometime before going out. It seemed not to fit well. I felt concerned about going out in this outfit.  By chance I ran into Om. She stopped me in the street. The first words she said, “Oh! I would love to give you a full length mirror so you can see how pretty that outfit is.” This made me laugh, due to  the concerns I had over this particular ‘outfit’.  Om, as always, was sparkling bright. Her eyes, great orbs of blue, appeared innocent and childlike. Yet,  Om’s life is not at all child like for she lives from day to day on very little. Often she is seen searching through rubbish for food.

Several years ago we had a long talk about her life in Puttparthi. She told me how she lived in one small room without even a fan. The room, she said,  in summer, was burning hot. By this time, Om had suffered many tropical illnesses. Also she suffered with her legs and feet. Today she walks with crutches, her once rich blondish hair is shaved.

One day I stopped to ask her why she stayed ?  ”Oh” she said, “I stay because that is my karma. I love Swami. I have given my life to him. I do not regret one single day here, despite the hardships.”

How does Om survive so many illnesses and hardships? I don’t know. She always appears to be positive and despite her illnesses, she manages to look after herself pretty well.

Last year, I remember, Swami coming out from the ashram in his car. Om was right there. He gave her a huge smile which she returned in no small measure.The local authorities recognize Om as being a Sannyasin. She is allowed to live in Puttaparthi without either passport or visa. I believe she is the only Westerner who can.

I feel sentimental towards Om.

Here’s a little ‘ode’ to her, honouring that huge leap of faith, and having the courage to believe in Swami for over 30 years of hardships and pain.


graphics – courtesy: Sai Art

Om here’s a poem for you.

“So I would choose to stay with you, if the choice was mine to make-

You can make decisions too, and you can have this heart to break.

And so it goes and so it goes.”

Good luck Om.

God wrote on the back of your heart to stay and love, and you did.

The Meaning Of AUM – Mantras and their Meanings


The letters A,U, and M created the friction that led to the beginning: the creation, preservation, and the dissolution. These three are known mythologically as the Conch of Visnu, The Damaru of Shiva, and the Tongue of Brahma. The primary manifestation of all activity is the cosmos comes from the principle of the three sounds.


The meaning of OM


 

What is the meaning of OM in the context of the Upanishads? The Upanishads teach that there is an eternal consciousness which remains ever the same is characterised by the functioning of the external senses, which receive and respond to the stream of impressions. The waking state appears to be the dominant state for the working of human life.

But each day, this waking state comes to a complete end when we withdraw into ourselves, close the doors and windows of the senses, and let our minds drift into an altogether different realm: the realm of sleep with dreams. Here again there is experience which seems similar to that of the waking state, but our environments in dream, the feel of our bodies, the people we mix with, are often very different to the scenario of our waking life. In dream, we can mingle happily with long lost relatives, somehow the pains of the body in the waking state have disappeared, and laws of time, space and causation, seem curiously flexible. The main thing about the dreaming state is that the outer senses are not operative; the whole spectacle takes place internally.

Then there is a third state, the state of dreamless sleep. This is a condition where dreams come to an end and there is total absence of mental activity. How do we know? We know in retrospect, when we wake up and feel: ‘Ah I must have slept so well, I remember nothing at all.’

The Upanishads say that dreamless sleep is a state of bliss, but such bliss is of a negative nature. It is the bliss of complete absence of the pairs of opposites, limitations and finitude. It is a kind of release and close to liberation, except that it is not a conscious experience. No one becomes liberated by going to sleep each night. This state too is brought to an end by our return to the waking state.

These three states make up the totality of empirical experience. It is clear that these states are passing and cancel each other out. Therefore, in the Vedanta analysis, they do not deserve to be called absolutely real. The vast importance of the waking state comes to a humble and humiliating end when we drift into dream. The fantastic imaginings of dream are more patently unreal, and they are completely dissolved when we wake up, or when we sink into dreamless sleep. And dreamless sleep, however sweet a condition, is rudely broken when we awaken from it and have to take on all the duties and burdens of waking life once again.

But all the time, alongside these three states, and illumining them from within, is the eternal consciousness, our true Self. It is sometimes called the fourth, or turiya; though far from being one more state like the others, turiya is the witness and support of all the three states. When understood, turiya is realised to be the whole of experience, the Absolute. Without this turiya, this eternal consciousness, the whole phenomenal cycle of waking, dream and dreamless sleep would have nothing to rest on. This eternal consciousness is not broken or interrupted by anything. It is this consciousness, which, reflected in the mind, gives us the senses of continuous identity, of being the same self, in spite of apparently losing ourselves completely in sleep and dream.

This is the Self to be realised, to be uncovered, in order to be liberated from the realm of the perishable. It is here that the symbology of OM shows us a path to freedom. OM points to the whole of the phenomenal realm, in its three phases, and also to the transcendent, which is the light behind experience. This way of analysing our experience can be shown by the visual symbol of OM, with the curves – lower,

middle and upper – representing, respectively, the states of waking, dreaming and dreamless sleep. Above these curves there is another which is set apart from the main form, to denote transcendence with the point signifying infinity.

Throughout experience, whether external, internal or quiescent as in deep sleep, the divine is always present equally as the turiya, just a the higher curve and the point always accompany and dominate the lower three. Therefore OM is a visual symbol representing the whole of experience both relative and absolute, finite and infinite.

The Mandukya Upanishad also shows how the word OM is a great symbol. The three states are represented by parts of the sound OM itself. Here the sound OM is depicted as having three phases. They are  usually represented in English by the letters A, U and M. The sound A (pronounced as in path) is the characteristic sound of the waking state. It is the sound of life and response to outer stimuli. A is the first sound produced when opening the mouth. The middle sound, U (pronounced as the oo in soon), is attributed to the dreaming state, and to states of internal mental activity, where we are withdrawn from outer objects. Mmm represents the Divine, and is associated with Lord Ganesha.

source: from the writings of Swami Rama

Om’s Amazing Story of Love and Courage

Banning is not only something that happens to those close physically to Sai, it happens to others who are seated in general public too. There are so many untold stories of seekers being banned, never to return. However, many banned devotees do not hold a grudge. They still love Swami, although they are not allowed to be anywhere near him. I’d say they were Swami’s closest devotees…


From My Memories


Om the daughter of professor parents who taught in Ivy league colleges in the USA, speaks with a cultured American accent. She  obviously, had at one time  enjoyed a very intellectual lifestyle and is herself a literati. How and why she came to visit Swami I have no idea. Came she did and stayed. Her story is one of the most interesting ones in Sai Baba circles. Yet hardly a word has been written about her.

Om enjoyed the casual ashram at Whitefield way back in the 1970’s where she had many close experiences with Sathya Sai. Yet  sometime later on she was made persona non grata. She was banned from entering all Sai ashrams.

I remember her telling me some years ago that Sai Baba had told her at dashan one day, that although she was a graduate, and clever, he was going to change all that. He did. Once Om was banned from the ashrams, she was devastated. Swami had obviously done an egodectomy on her, now what to do next? She did not know.She visited Sri Ramana’s Ashram in Tamil Nadu for a time to think it over. She was at the time quite ill due to the ban. She did not function well and she was thought a little odd there among Ramana devotees.

Om after reflecting her position while at Ramana’s ashram, made the decision to stay in India to become a Sannyasin. She throw away her passport, clothes and all other possessions. She took to wearing a simple  orange robe. After sometime she returned to Puttaparthi and began a life of  total austerity.

I first noticed her on my second visit to P.N. ashram way back in the late 1980’s. She use to stand outside the old darshan area, looking over the wall, watching Swami give darshan. I remember even now how a beautiful smile would flashed across her face whenever she saw him. Her dismissal had not soured her in the least. She was full of love for him. Besides her beautiful smile,  her face  shone brightly whenever in the vicinity of the ashram.

It is only in recent years we have began to speak to each other. She often stops me when I am shopping in Puttaparthi. Om likes to comment on my clothes. This year’s encounter with Om was pretty strange. On this certain day before the shopping trip, I’d been looking in the mirror at my Salwar Kameez for sometime before going out. It seemed not to fit well.I felt concerned about going out in this ill fitting outfit.  By chance I run into Om. She stopped me in the street. The first words she said, “Oh! I would love to give you a full length mirror so you can see how pretty that outfit is.” This made me laugh, due to concerns I had over this particular ‘outfit.’  Om as always was sparkling bright. Her eyes, great orbs of blue, appeared innocent and childlike. Yet  Om’s life is not at all child like for she lives from day to day on very little. Often she is seen searching through rubbish for food.

Several years ago we had a long talk about her life in Prashanti. She told me how she lived in one small room without even a fan. The room she said –  in summer was burning hot. Om, by this time had suffered many tropical illnesses. Also she  suffered with her legs and feet. Today she walks with crutches her once rich blondish hair is shaved.

One day I stopped to  asked her why did she stay?  ”Oh” she said, “I stay because that is my karma. I love Swami. I have given my life to him. I do not regret one single day here, despite the hardships.”

How does Om survive so many illnesses and hardships? I don’t know. She always appears to be positive and despite her illnesses, she manages to look after herself pretty well.

Last year I remember, Swami coming out from the ashram in his car.  Om was right there. He gave her a huge smile which she returned in no small measure.

The local authorities recognize Om as being a Sannyasin. She is allowed to live in Puttaparthi without either passport or visa. I believe she is the only Westerner who can.

I feel sentalmental towards “Om.”

So here’s a little ‘ode’ to her to honor her huge leap of faith, in having courage to believe in Swami for over 30 years of hardships.

Om, here’s a poem for you.


“So I would choose to stay with you, if the choice was mine to make, You can make decisions too, and you can have this heart to break. And so it goes and so it goes.”

Good luck Om.

Inspirational – Mantra And Meanings

Deva Premal singing Om Mani Padme Hum

The mantra of Tantrik buddhism is ‘Om Mani Padme Hum’. Om is the sound of central enlightenment; ‘mani padme’ means ‘jewel in the lotus’ or ‘male with the female organ’, the state of completeness, energy infusing wisdom. ‘Hum’ is the sound of power, forcing the mantra into realization. This energy is often symbolised by an implement called the vajra, double-ended with ornate curbed prongs enclosing a central straight prong. All Tantrik Buddhists own one, which serves each person as a reservoir of personal power.

Vajrapani means ‘he who holds the vajra’. And to help forward his meditation, the Tantrik monk may also use a bell, whose rim he gently and continuously rubs with a stick so as to produce a sustained, gentle and entrancing hum. The sound is the symbol for the remotest expression of the subtlest Indian mantra ‘Om’ itself. For Tantra, like all good science, recognises that the fabric of even the densest-seeming objects is of an order related to vibration, which is symbolised for the human intelligence by sound.

*•.♥ Love ♥.•**·.

 

 

 

 

There is Only One Religion -The Religion of Love. -Sai Baba

 


 

Dharma doesn’t necessarily mean following a mundane and boring life.

It means a life of high adventure, not a life of endless, boring repetition.


Souls have different journeys.

The best thing to know is, not what everybody else does,

but what you do. Self-discovery essentially is finding your own dharma, your own rhythm.


We are not human beings having a spiritual experience. We are spritual beings having

a human experience.”

Teihard de Chadin

♥.♥.♥.♥.♥.♥.♥.♥.♥.♥.♥.♥.♥.

♥.♥.♥.♥.♥.♥.
♥.♥.♥.♥.░░░♥.♥.♥.♥.░░░..♥.♥.♥.♥.
♥.♥.♥.░░░░░♥.♥░░░░░.♥.♥.♥.♥♥.♥.♥░░░░░░░░░░░░♥.♥.♥.♥