The Lake Under The Moon – Metta Teachings

Winter is behind us now. This brings a feeling of light, hope and openness. We can look out of the window at trees and see them forming leaves. Golden Daffodils adorn our gardens once more. The snowdrops and crocuses are also bountiful. This year more than most! I like to think it is not only a new beginning but  also a time to ponder on what lies ahead. Although in the quiet moments  of a Spring day, reflection on what has past is often more on our minds.  Dare we expect more from this new year than the last?  In the old Pali dialect, the language of the Buddha (upanijjhāna),  “reflection” has the self-same meaning that it does in English—it means to be like a mirror or the surface of a deep pond, to receive an impression and hold it without adding anything else. It also means to contemplate or consciously consider. To listen to the inner voice of reason.

Years ago, at Chuang Yen Monastery in Carmel, New York, Bhikkhu Bodhi spoke of this, and of the Buddha’s advice to his 7-year-old son Rahula. The Buddha told his son about the importance of honesty, telling young Rahula to practice reflection—to reflect on the inner and outer consequences before, during, and after doing something. Please consider trying this. The results are subtle but quite amazing. Consider how you feel before you perform an act of generosity, during, and after. Also consider how it feels to do something less than noble or not do something. Let’s say, not to eat or drink too much or be angry or stingy, to un-grasp the hand of lifelong habits. What is amazing is that this type of practice of reflecting on the quality and consequence of our lives is a way to expand time by opening and deepening and enriching the time we have to spare.

In meditation or just being  alone with our thoughts , we allow ourselves to reflect on something that has already happened. We can allow a memory or experience to arise within us, and like the surface of a deep pond, reflecting the moon without fighting it or fleeing from it or freezing it or adding anything at all. Remember that the ancient root of the word, “understand” means to stand under, to allow the truth of something to soak in. It also suggests holding and supporting, standing under our own experience, receiving it. Think of the lake under the moon.

Crocuses in the garden

Re-written from an article published in Parabola magazine.

Might be a good idea to subscribe. They need supporting.

Rainbow Over Puttaparthi – 15.7.11. – More Sathya Sai Memories

 

Puttaparthi, at 6.30 p.m. after the First Gurupourmina Festival without our Physical Baba

 

Blessed on Gurupurnima : Puttaparthi 15th July 2011, 6.30 pm

The rainbow is a symbol of the divine presence, the bow of God, the brilliant light display of glory around God’s throne. So the rainbows evoke a kind of deep spiritual fervor and hope for a divinely blessed life.

 


Details on Rainbows

The experience of seeing the colours of the rainbow, when the sun is shining and it has been raining, is one we all can share. The experience often has a magical quality to it as though it is stirring some deep inner response. Such is the wonder of the light that forms the colours of the rainbow.

Emmanuel Swedenborg, one of the greatest spiritual pioneers of the western world, readily recognised the universal importance of light. To use his term, it corresponds to the inner awakening of enlightenment caused by the shining light inherent in truth and wisdom dispelling the darkness of doubt and despair.

Most of the colours that you and I see are produced by part of the sun’s light energy being absorbed/smothered by the objects around us. The red chair, say, gives far less light energy than it receives, whereas the heavenly principle is to GIVE AS WE RECEIVE. To consider light and colour from a spiritual viewpoint we should look at colour by transmitted light. These colours are, of course, the colours of the rainbow, when no light is lost but its inner beauties are quite literally opened out before our eyes as it shines through the transparent water droplets in the rain cloud. We are not intended to absorb the light … enlightenment, joy and happiness … rather we are intended to transmit it; and in doing so to unfold its meaning for others, and for ourselves too.

 The colours of the rainbow are not just wonderful images in our natural world but also convey deep spiritual meaning.

Isaac Newton, discovered how to produce the colours of the rainbow using a glass prism and a slit of light. Schoolchildren the world over still sense his joy of discovery in repeating this experiment for themselves. The mystical importance of the rainbow is intuitively perceived by almost everyone. It brings out the childlikeness in us … the ‘look what I’ve found’ spontaneous desire to share. It inspires a sense of joy and optimism, linked to another childlike quality – wonder.