Mathnawi III: 2248-80 (The Soul Of Rumi) – Inspirational Quotations

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♥•*¨`*☼¸.•*¨Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ

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There is a way of loving not attached to what is loved. Observe how water is with the ground, always moving toward the ocean, though the ground tries to hold water’s foot and not let it go. This is how we are with wine and beautiful food, wealth and power, or just a dry piece of bread: we want and we get drunk with wanting, then the headache and bitterness afterward. Those prove that the attachment took hold and held you back.

Now you proudly refuse help. “My love is pure. I have an intuitive union with God. I don’t need anyone to show me how to be free!” This is not the case. A love with no object is a true love. All else, shadow without substance. Have you seen someone fall in love with his own shadow? That’s what we’ve done. Leave partial loves and find one that’s whole.

Where is someone who can do that? They’re so rare, those hearts that carry the blessing and lavish it over everything. Hold out your
beggar’s robe and accept their generosity. Anything not coming from that will damage the cloth, like a sharp stone tearing your sincerity. Keep that intact, and use clarity; call it reason or discernment, you have within you a deciding force that knows what to receive, what to turn from.

— Rumi…..Mathnawi III: 2248-80
Version by Coleman Barks
“The Soul of Rumi”

Rumi – A Poem – Inspirational Quotations

Once a man came and knocked at the door of his friend.
His friend said, “Who art thou, O faithful one?”
He said, “‘Tis I.” He answered, “There is no admittance.
There is no room for the ‘raw’ at my well-cooked feast.
Naught but fire of separation and absence
Can cook the raw one and free him from hypocrisy!
Since thy ‘self’ has not yet left thee,
Thou must be burned in fiery flames.”
The poor man went away, and for one whole year
Journeyed burning with grief for his friend’s absence.
His heart burned till it was cooked; then he went again
And drew near to the house of his friend.
He knocked at the door in fear and trepidation
Lest some careless word might fall from his lips.
His friend shouted, “Who is that at the door?”
He answered, “‘Tis Thou who art at the door, O Beloved!”
The friend said, “Since ’tis I, let me come in,
There is not room for two ‘I’s in one house.”

~♥Jalāl ad-Dīn Muḥammad Rūmī♥~

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Persian lawyer-divine and Sufi, widely considered literature’s greatest mystical poet, understood very well the uncontrollable and idiosyncratic impact of poetry. Yet one wonders if even he, for all his intuitive grasp of language, humanity and the cosmos foresaw the deep and diverse influence his own work would have on readers throughout the world seven centuries after his death-or the myriad meanings enthusiasts would draw from his sprawling and contradictory poems. In the Islamic world today, Rumi is read for much the same reasons he was revered during his life: for his excellence as a poet; for his rare ability to empathize with humans, animals and plants; for his personal refinement; and, above all else, for his flawless moral center and ability to direct others towards good conduct and union with Allah.

Excerpt kindly provided by Eileen judd

Oneness – Rumi

If an earthen pot is on the ground and we turn it over and place it upside down, and if the pot then looks up, it will see only its earthen body, not the sky. Kept upside down, even if the pot looks upwards, what will it see? All it will be able to see is its own base, its own layer of mud — its body — but not the sky. Then we place the pot the right way up, its face towards the sky. Then when it looks up toward the sky it will be able to see, “I am not the body.” Now the pot will also be able to see, “The small sky which is within me is the same sky that is outside; and between the two of us nowhere is there any gap, we are inseparable. It is me who has expanded into the sky above, and it is the sky above that has come all the way down into me — nowhere is there any obstacle, any boundary, any wall in between.”

A similar thing happens when you are looking towards your body; you are like a pot turned upside down — you see only the body. When you turn away from your body, you become like a pot kept right way up — now you are facing the sky. As a person turns away from the body, immediately he is focused towards the sky and sees for the first time that there is not even a grain of difference between him and this vast existence spread all around. He has become the vast existence, the vast existence has reached out to him.

 

O SEEKER OF THE TRUTH! BY KNOWING THE ONENESS OF THE SOUL AND THE SUPREME SOUL, JUST LIKE THE ONENESS OF GHATAKASH, THE SKY WITHIN A POT, AND MAHAKASH, THE SKY WITHOUT A POT, UNDIVIDEDLY BE ALWAYS PEACEFUL.
~Osho

“SAY WHO I AM”

I am dust particles in sunlight.
I am the round sun.

To the bits of dust I say, ‘Stay.’
To the sun, ‘Keep moving.’

I am morning mist,
and the beginning of evening.

I am wind in the top of a grove,
and surf on the cliff.

Mast, rudder, helmsman, and keel,
I am also the coral reef they founder on.

I am a tree with a trained parrot in its branches.
Silence, thought, and voice.

The musical air coming through a flute,
a spark off a stone, a flickering

in metal. Both candle,
and the moth crazy around it.

Rose, and the nightingale
lost in the fragrance.

I am all orders of being, the circling galaxy,
the evolutionary intelligence, the lift,

and the falling away. What is,
and what isn’t. You who know

Jelaluddin, You the One
in all, say who

I am. Say I
am You.”

– Rumi, from THE HAND OF POETRY: FIVE MYSTIC POETS OF PERSIA (ISBN 0930872479)

Mystical Poets and Seers – Rumi & St. Augustine -Rumi

photo from the Internet

Jalalud’Din Rumi, the 13th century Persian lawyer-divine and Sufi, widely considered literature’s greatest mystical poets, understood very well the uncontrollable and idiosyncratic impact of poetry. Yet one wonders if even he, for all his intuitive grasp of language, humanity and the cosmos foresaw the deep and diverse influence his own work would have on readers throughout the world seven centuries after his death-or the myriad meanings enthusiasts would draw from his sprawling and contradictory poems. In the Islamic world today, Rumi is read for much the same reasons he was revered during his life: for his excellence as a poet; for his rare ability to empathize with humans, animals and plants; for his personal refinement; and, above all else, for his flawless moral center and ability to direct others towards good conduct and union with Allah.


I went crazy last night, love ran into me and said:
‘I am coming, do not shout, do not tear your clothes, speak no more.’
‘O love!’ I said: ‘I am afraid of other things.’
‘There is nothing else’ it said: ‘speak no more.
I shall whisper hidden words into your ear;
You just nod in approval! except in secret speak no more!’

(Divan 2219:1-5)

Translated by Fatemeh Keshavarz,  ‘Reading Mystical Lyric.’
University of South Carolina Press, 1998.




St. Augustine’s, out-pouring of love and separation from Christ is equal to the longing of Rumi for Shams. Although, St. Augustine is well known within Christian circles, his writings are not as universally known or as appreciated as those of Rumi.  Both wrote with  intensity about their love, separation, suffering and  longing for union with their spiritual masters.

The Confessions – St. Augustine

“Seek for yourself, O man; search for your true self. He who seeks shall find himself in God.”

In The Confessions, Saint Augustine addressed himself eloquently and passionately to the enduring spiritual questions that have stirred the minds and hearts of thoughtful men since time began. Written A.D. 397, The Confessions are a history of the young Augustine’s fierce struggle to overcome his profligate ways and achieve a life of spiritual grace.

The first ten books of the work relate the story of Augustine’s childhood in Numidia; his licentious and riotous youth and early manhood in Carthage, Rome, and Milan; his continuous struggle with evil; his attempts to find an anchor for his faith among the Manicheans and the Neoplatonists; the untiring efforts of his mother, Saint Monnica, to save him from self-destruction; and his ultimate conversion to the Christian faith at the age of thirty-two.

The last three books of The Confessions, unrelated to the preceding account of Saint Augustine’s early life, are an allegorical explanation of the Mosaic account of Creation. Throughout the work, the narrative, addressed to God, is interspersed with prayers, meditations, and instructions, many of which today are to be found in the liturgies of all sects of the Christian Church.

The Confessions constitutes perhaps the most moving diary ever recorded of of a soul’s journey to grace. Appearing midway in Saint Augustine’s prodigious body of theological writings, they stand among the most persuasive works of the sinner-turned-priest who was to exercise a greater influence on Christian thought than any of the other Church fathers.

— From the Collier Books edition

 

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Late have I loved you, O Beauty ever ancient, ever new, late have I loved you! You were within me, but I was outside, and it was there that I searched for you. In my unloveliness I plunged into the lovely things which you created. You were with me, but I was not with you. Created things kept me from you; yet if they had not been in you they would have not been at all. You called, you shouted, and you broke through my deafness. You flashed, you shone, and you dispelled my blindness. You breathed your fragrance on me; I drew in breath and now I pant for you. I have tasted you, now I hunger and thirst for more. You touched me, and I burned for your peace.

from The Confessions of Saint Augustine


Rumi Quotations – Rumi

Here I offer a small collection of Rumi’s ecstatic love poems, translated by Coleman Barks and Shahram Shiva. He spoke of lover and beloved as well as Lover and Beloved. He was in touch with them being the same, and both as being one.

♥♥♥ Divine ♥♥♥..♥:-)


A Smile and A Gentleness

There is a smile and a gentleness
inside. When I learned the name

and address of that, I went to where
you sell perfume. I begged you not

to trouble me so with longing. Come
out and play! Flirt more naturally.

Teach me how to kiss. On the ground
a spread blanket, flame that’s caught

and burning well, cumin seeds browning,
I am inside all of this with my soul.

From Essential Rumi

by Coleman Barks


♥♥♥Divine ♥♥♥..♥:-)

“The minute I heard my first love story,
I started looking for you, not knowing
how blind that was.

Lovers don’t finally meet somewhere,
they’re in each other all along.”

From Essential Rumi

loveboth
♥♥♥ divine ♥♥♥..♥:-)

“I have phrases and whole pages memorized,
but nothing can be told of love.
You must wait until you and I
are living together.
In the conversation we’ll have
then…be patient…then.”

From Essential Rumi
One who does what the Friend wants done
will never need a friend.

There’s a bankruptcy that’s pure gain.
The moon stays bright when it
doesn’t avoid the night.

A rose’s rarest essence
lives in the thorn.

From Soul of Rumi

by Coleman Barks


Only From Your Heart – Sathya Sai Baba Quotations

Only from the heart ♥ Can you touch the sky¸.•´♥ Rumi

*•.¸¸♡¸¸.•*¨*¨Love`*•.¸¸♡¸¸.•*¨You`*✽~☼

My brother used to ask the birds to forgive him; that sounds senseless but it is right,for all is like the ocean, all things flow and touch each other; a disturbance in one place is felt at the other end of the world. It may be folly to beg forgiveness of the birds, but the birds would be happier at your side – a little happier anyway – and children and all animals, if yourself were nobler than you are now. It’s all like an ocean, I tell you. Then you would pray to the birds, too – in an all consuming love – that they forgive you your sins. Prize this ecstasy, however senseless as it may appear to men.-The Brothers Karamazov

*•.¸¸♡¸¸.•*¨*¨Love`*•.¸¸♡¸¸.•*¨You`*✽~☼

When a person asserts that he is low and mean and that he knows but little, he becomes low and mean and his knowledge shrinks.We become what we believe we are. We are children of Almighty God, endowed with Supreme, Power, Glory and Wisdom.We are children of Immortality.When we dwell in this thought, how can we ever be low and ignorant?

– Sathya Sai Baba


*•.¸¸♡¸¸.•*¨*¨Love`*•.¸¸♡¸¸.•*¨You`*✽~☼

Laying studies aside,

into a stream the books Kabir threw.

Out of alphabet letters – fifty-two,

he memorised RA-MA – only two!

(Ra Ma A Hindu God)

-Kabirdas

 

*•.¸¸♡¸¸.•*¨*¨Love`*•.¸¸♡¸¸.•*¨You`*✽~☼