Nisargadatta Maharaj Speaks On Wisdom – Faith

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Nisargadatta  Maharaj once said:

“Wisdom tells me I am nothing. Love tells me I am everything. Between these two, my life flows.” ‘I am nothing’ does not mean there  is a void or a wasteland within. What it means is that with constant awareness we open to a clear, unimpeded space, without centre or boundaries, there is nothing separate.  Being nothing in this way, we are also, inevitably, everything there is. “Everything” does not mean self- importance or the egotistical idea that self-aggrandisement is everything,  but a decisive recognition of interconnection; we are not separate. Both the clear open space of ‘nothing’ and the interconnectedness of ‘everything;’ awakens us to our true nature.”

 

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Here is a story about a powerful emperor who found that owning nothing gave him more happiness that owning everything.

Ashoka was an emperor in northern India who lived around two hundred years after the time of the Buddha. In the early years of his reign, he was a bloody tyrant. He wanted everything for himself. Land, riches, gems, jewels, he was greedy for them all. Ashoka might have been emperor but inside he was a very unhappy man. A man who could not find happiness even though he had conquered all the lands.

One day, after a particularly terrible battle that he had launched in order to acquire more land and wealth, he walked on to the battlefield amid the appalling spectacle of corpses of men and animals strewn everywhere, already rotting in the warmth of the sun. He watched as the carrion-eating birds devoured the bodies. Ashoka was aghast at the carnage he had reaped. He sat down and cried.

Just then a Buddhist monk came walking across the battlefield. The monk did not say a word, but his being was quite radiant with peace and happiness. Seeing the monk, Ashoka thought, “Why is it that I, having everything in the world, feel so miserable? Whereas the monk has nothing to call his own, other than the robes he wears and the bowl he carries,  looks so serene and happy, even in this terrible place?”

Ashoka made a momentous decision on that day. He pursued the monk and asked him, “Are you happy? If so, how did this come to be? How can you be happy with nothing?” In response, the monk who had nothing, introduced the emperor, who had everything, to the Buddha’s teachings. The consequence of this chance meeting, was Ashoka changed from that day onward. Ashoka devoted himself to the practice and study of Buddhism and changed the entire nature of his reign. He stopped waging wars. He fed the poor and gave them homes.  He transformed himself from a terrible tyrant into one of history’s most respected rulers, acclaimed for thousands of years after as just and benevolent.

Hymn To God – Faith

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The following meditation is a ‘Hymn to God’ which came to St. Symeon as light from his appreciative heart. Symeon was a tenth-century Christian, who came to be known as The New Theologian. He wrote about his inner experiences more freely than any previous Christian known to us. He also wrote with great love about his spiritual master, Symeon, the Pious, whom Symeon, the New Theologian, acknowledged as the essential key to his own enlightenment.

“Then as I was meditating, Master, on these things, suddenly you appeared from above, much greater than the sun and you shone brilliantly from the heavens down into my heart:

O what intoxication of Light,

O what movements of Fire,

Oh, what swirling of the flame in me,

miserable one that I am.

Coming from you and your Glory!…

I fall in adoration before You…

You appeared as light, illuminating me

completely from your Light,

and I become Light in the night.

I who was found in the midst of darkness.

There was poured into my soul in unutterable fashion

a great spiritual joy and perception.

And a sweetness surpassing every taste of visible objects.

Together with a freedom and forgetfulness’

of all thoughts pertaining to this life…

Thus all the perceptions of my mind and my soul

were wholly concentrated on the ineffable joy

of that Light.”

¤ º ¤`•.¸.•´¤ º ¤ •.¸¸.•´¯`•.¸¸.* ♥

thank you for the light.

The Opening Of Eyes – Inspirational Poems

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I was out in the garden this afternoon looking for flowers to photograph. I came across the first “Forget Me Not” flower of the season. I rarely take photos of these flowers, due to them being so small. I was really happy with this photo though, the leaves with the raindrops gave it a real feeling of prettiness. According to an ancient legend, a knight about to get married, dressed in his armor, was taking a ride along a river with his fiancée. His fiancée saw an extremely beautiful bunch of blue flowers rocking on the waves, and asked her paramour to pick them up. As he reached over to get them, the knight slipped and fell into the river.

The heavy armor hindered him from swimming and he started sinking into the water, but not before throwing her the blue flowers and shouting: “Don’t forget me!” This beautiful flower came to be known as Forget-me-not, associated in the language of flowers with true love – the love that never dies.

 

The Opening of Eyes

That day I saw beneath dark clouds
the passing light over the water
and I heard the voice of the world speak out,
I knew then, as I had before
life is no passing memory of what has been
nor the remaining pages in a great book
waiting to be read.
It is the opening of eyes long closed.
It is the vision of far off things
seen for the silence they hold.
It is the heart after years
of secret conversing
speaking out loud in the clear air.

It is Moses in the desert
fallen to his knees before the lit bush.
It is the man throwing away his shoes
as if to enter heaven
and finding himself astonished,
opened at last,
fallen in love with solid ground.

– David Whyte
from Songs for Coming Home
©1984 Many Rivers Press

The Power Of Thought – Science And Spirituality

Music and Lyrics: “Stay The Same”  by Joey McIntyre – beautiful

 

Masaru Emotos extraordinary work is an awesome display, and powerful tool that can change our perceptions of ourselves and the world we live in forever. We now have profound evidence that we can positively heal and transform ourselves and our planet by the thoughts we choose to think and the ways in which we put those thoughts into practice. I hope you take a minute or two to watch this delightful you tube with details about the wonderful work being undertaken by Dr. Masaru Emoto.

 

The Power Of Thought   – all quotes from Daskalos – Researchers of Truth.

 

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“Every thought, emotion and desire creates and transmits an “elemental” – also called thought-form – that carries on an existence of its own. We create and regenerate two types of elementals. When negative emotion prevails over thought, we have created emotional thought-forms, or desire-thoughts. When our ideas, desires and emotions pass through reason and love, we create reasoned thought-forms, or thought-desires. An elemental can never be destroyed, only disenergized (when no longer fed with etheric vitality). Elementals of a kind collect to form powerful group elementals. If an individual, or a collection of individuals, are vibrating at the same frequency, they will attract such group elementals. Archangels also create elementals (e.g. nature spirits and angels) in the service of the Divine Plan.”

 

“With appropriate training, we can project and direct etheric vitality from the etheric doubles of the bodies and send it over vast distances, and perform so-called miracles. To do this we can take part of the Mind-substance of etheric vitality, give it form and project it as a mental image, outside both our gross material body and our etheric double.”

“The thought forms are emitted with an intensity corresponding to the strength of the desires which gave birth to them. When they have reached their goal and served their purpose, they return to their creator to be projected once again with ever increasing power. This procedure is repeated many times, creating within our personality, either a terrible environ­ment of darkness if the thought forms are of low degree, or a strong atmosphere of love if they are good thought-desires.”

 

“Just as the gross material body consists of many cells, organized into a working whole, so our personality consists of a network of interdependent psycho-noetical images. The cells of our personality, as we might call them, are precisely, one by one, the thought-forms which we create and project as a result of our desires and weaknesses, strengths and virtues.”

“With every thought, each glance, idea, distraction or feeling we create thought forms. Even as we sleep, we are emitting thought forms that will affect us and those around us.”

 

“The thought forms are emitted with an intensity corresponding to the strength of the desires which gave birth to them. When they have reached their goal and served their purpose, they return to their creator to be projected once again with ever increasing power. This procedure is repeated many times, creating within our personality, either a terrible environ­ment of darkness if the thought forms are of low degree, or a strong atmosphere of love if they are good thought-desires.”

Karma Wisdom – Faith

 

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The word karma is a Sanskrit term that means “work, deed, or act”; it has also been interpreted to mean “cause and effect.”   Karma can simply be defined as memory. It is not really a “debt” that must be paid according to some universal tally sheet nor is it necessarily a set of specific circumstances that must be experienced because of deeds or misdeeds from the past. Karma is simply memory. It is a pool of information that the subconscious mind draws upon and can utilize in the present. It has elements that are positive as well as those which seem negative. For example, an immediate affinity toward an individual is as likely to be “karmic” as is an immediate animosity toward someone else. To be sure, this subconscious memory has an effect and influence on how we think, how we react, what we choose, and even how we look! But the component of free will is ever within our grasp. 

 

 


“It is often imagined that the human being is subject to an irrevocable law of karma in which nothing can be changed. Let us take a simile from everyday life to explain the working of this law.

 

A businessman enters debits and credits in his account books; taken together, these entries tell him the current state of his business. The financial state of his business is subject to the inexorable law governing the calculation of debit and credit. If he carries out any new transactions he can make additional entries and he would be a fool if he were unwilling to embark on further business once a balance had been drawn up. In respect to karma, everything good, intelligent and true that has been done by a person belongs on the credit side; evil or foolish deeds belong on the debit side. At every moment the individual is free to make new entries in the karmic book of life. It must never be imagined that life is under the sway of an immutable law of destiny; freedom is not impaired by the law of karma. In studying the law of karma, therefore, the future must be borne in mind as strongly as the past. Bearing within us the effects of past deeds, we are the slaves of the past, but the masters of the future. If we are to have a favourable future, we must make as many good entries as possible in the book of life.

 

It is a great and potent thought to know that nothing we do is in vain, that everything has its effect in the future. The law of karma is the reverse of depressing; it fills us with the splendid hope, and knowledge of it is the most precious gift of spiritual science. It brings happiness inasmuch as it opens out a vista into the future. It charges us to be active for its sake; there is nothing whatever in it to make us sad, nothing which could give the world a pessimistic colouring; it lends wings to our will to co-operate in the evolution of the earth. Such are the feelings into which knowledge of karma must be transmuted.

 

When a person is suffering, people sometimes say: ‘He deserves his suffering and must bear his karma; if I help him, I am interfering with his karma’. This is nonsense. His poverty, his misery is caused through his earlier life, but if I help him, new entries will be made in his book of life; my help takes him forward. It would be foolish to say to a businessman who could be saved from disaster by 1000 or 10000 marks: ‘No, for that would alter your balance sheet’. It is precisely this possibility of altering the balance-sheet that should induce us to help someone. I help him because I know that nothing is without its karmic effect. This knowledge should spur us on to purposeful action.”

 

- from ROSICRUCIAN WISDOM by Rudolf Steiner (ISBN 9781855840638)

The Snow Queen

E.D.:

The Ice Queen… Delightful post from Tree of Life.

Originally posted on The Tree of Life:

The Snow Queen

Snow Queen

The Snow Queen by H.C. Andersen is an extraordinary story, containing the primary dangers of man.

We have the following main players in the story:

  • The Devil, who creates the troll-mirror who distorts the perceived reality.
  • The Snow Queen, which palace and gardens are in the lands of permafrost. She is successful in abducting Kay after he has fallen victim to the splinters of the troll-mirror.
  • An old sorceress, who maintains a cottage on the river, with a garden that is permanently in summer. She seeks to keep Gerda with her, but Gerda’s thought of roses (the flower most favored by herself and Kay) awakens her from the old woman’s enchantment.
  • Kay, a little boy, who falls victim to the splinters of the troll-mirror and the blandishments of the Snow Queen.
  • Gerda, the heroine of this tale, who succeeds in finding and saving Kai…

View original 502 more words

Thich Nhat Hanh And Mindfulness

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Thich Nhat Hanh, the 87-year-old Zen master considered by many to be the father of mindfulness in the west, says as long as business leaders practice “true” mindfulness, it does not matter if the original intention is triggered by wanting to be more effective at work or to make bigger profits. That is because the practice will fundamentally change their perspective on life as it naturally opens hearts to greater compassion and develops the desire to end the suffering of others.

Sitting in a lotus position on the floor of his monastery at Plum Village near Bordeaux, France, Thay tells the Guardian: “If you know how to practice mindfulness you can generate peace and joy right here, right now. And you’ll appreciate that and it will change you. In the beginning, you believe that if you cannot become number one, you cannot be happy, but if you practice mindfulness you will readily release that kind of idea. We need not fear that mindfulness might become only a means and not an end because in mindfulness the means and the end are the same thing. There is no way to happiness; happiness is the way.”

But Thay, as the Zen master is known to his hundreds of thousands of followers around the world, points out that if executives are in the practice for selfish reasons, then they are experiencing a mere pale shadow of mindfulness.

“If you consider mindfulness as a means of having a lot of money, then you have not touched its true purpose,” he says. “It may look like the practise of mindfulness but inside there’s no peace, no joy, no happiness produced. It’s just an imitation. If you don’t feel the energy of brotherhood, of sisterhood, radiating from your work, that is not mindfulness.”

As he puts it: “If you’re happy, you cannot be a victim of your happiness. But if you’re successful, you can be a victim of your success.

 


A Day At Google HQ

Thay’s core message to the tech leaders he met was to use their global influence to focus on how they can contribute to making the world a better place, rather than on making as much money as possible.

He and a group of monastics spent a day at Google’s headquarters, spending time with the senior management as well as leading around 700 employees through mindfulness discussions and sitting and walking meditation. So many staff wanted to take part that the company had to open up two additional locations to live stream his lecture.

Thay speaks of the sharp contrast between the normal frenetic pace of work at the technology giant and the sense of peace that came from sitting in silence during his day of mindfulness on the Googleplex campus.The atmosphere was totally different“, he says. “There’s a silence, there’s a peace that comes from doing nothing. And in that space, they can realise the preciousness of time.


Advice for The Tech Industry

During his visit, which was themed “intention, innovation, insight”, Thay met a number of senior Google engineers to discuss how the company can use technology to be more compassionate and effective in bringing positive change to the world, rather than increasing people’s stress and isolation, both from each other and from nature.

“When they create electronic devices, they can reflect on whether that new product will take people away from themselves, their family and nature,” he says. “Instead they can create the kind of devices and software that can help them to go back to themselves, to take care of their feelings. By doing that, they will feel good because they’re doing something good for society.

At the day-long retreat with the CEOs, Thay led a silent meditation and offered a Zen tea ceremony before talking to the group of largely billionaires about how important it is that they, as individuals, resist being consumed by work at the expense of time with their families: “Time is not money,” he told them. “Time is life, time is love.”

Back at his Plum Village monastery, near Bordeaux, Thay says of his trip: “In all the visits, I told them they have to conduct business in such a way that happiness should be possible for everyone in the company. What is the use of having more money if you suffer more? They also should understand that if they have a good aspiration, they become happier because helping society to change gives life a meaning.

The trip was just the beginning, he adds. “I think we planted a number of seeds and it will take time for the seeds to mature,” he says. “If they begin to practise mindfulness, they’ll experience joy, happiness, transformation, and they can fix for themselves another kind of aspiration. Fame and power and money cannot really bring true happiness compared to when you have a way of life that can take care of your body and your feelings.

 

http://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/thich-nhat-hanh-mindfulness-google-tech

Every Moment The Guru – Inspirational Quotations

aswamirose2 23 November 1926 – 24 April 2011

“Life always gives us
exactly the teacher we need
at every moment.
This includes every mosquito,
every misfortune,
every red light,
every traffic jam,
every obnoxious supervisor (or employee),
every illness, every loss,
every moment of joy or depression,
every addiction,
every piece of garbage,
every breath.

Every moment is the guru.”

~ Charlotte Joko Beck

 


 

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During the 1990’s, when darshans were daily and much more personal, I wrote down my treasured moments, knowing that time was marching on and that we were reaching the end of those special moments with Sai Baba. Here is  a glimpse into the  past from my old notebook of stories.

“On my second visit in 1991, a huge beautiful butterfly flew into my room and landed on the floor where it died. It was such a beautiful thing, the wings, of shimmering orange, red and black, glowed in the afternoon sunshine, that filtered through the small  window. The size of a small bird, the butterfly had unusual markings on its wings. It was too beautiful to die, I thought, ’something like that should live forever’.  I could not bring myself to remove the dead butterfly from the floor, I left it there and went to darshan. While seated for darshan, I glanced round at the ladies seated near me, all of them resembled colourful butterflies. Their saris looked every bit as beautiful and shimmering as the butterfly wings. The afternoon passed, as usual, with Sai Baba giving darshan, taking letters, throwing sweets, and taking people for interviews. It seemed to me, at the time, this would last forever.


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Returning to the room after darshan, I was shocked to see that the dead butterfly on the floor had already lost its lustre and was being eaten by ants. In just a few hours, it had been reduced from its previous luminance form of radiance, to a crumbling mass of dead cells. It was sad to see, although the lesson of the butterfly had not been lost on me. We only have so much time when we are young and life is a dream. Old age, loss of health and death are inevitable. We fall and die just like that butterfly. Best to use our time well, because who knows what  tomorrow will bring.”